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Sunday, October 26
 

9:00am EDT

CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellowship Meeting
Moderators
AB

Alice Bishop

Senior Program Officer, CLIR
avatar for Rita Van Duinen

Rita Van Duinen

Curriculum & Research Strategist, CLIR/DLF

Presenters
LC

Lauren Coats

Assistant Professor, LSU
ES

Elliott Shore

Executive Director, Association of Research Libraries


Sunday October 26, 2014 9:00am - 5:00pm EDT
Clough Commons, Room 323, Georgia Tech 266 4th St NW, Atlanta, GA 30313

1:00pm EDT

Registration
Pick up your badge early and skip the line.

Sunday October 26, 2014 1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Hotel Lobby GTHCC

1:30pm EDT

E-Research Peer Network and Mentoring Group (ERPNMG) Meeting
In-person meeting for participants of the ERPNMG.

Moderators
avatar for Rita Van Duinen

Rita Van Duinen

Curriculum & Research Strategist, CLIR/DLF

Presenters
avatar for Inna Kouper

Inna Kouper

Indiana University
NN

Natsuko Nicholls

Research Data Consultant, Virginia Tech
avatar for Ixchel M Faniel PhD

Ixchel M Faniel PhD

Research Scientist, OCLC
My interests include improving how people discover, access and use/reuse content. I'm currently examining how academics manage, share and reuse research data and librarians’ experiences designing and delivering supportive research data management programs. I'm also investigating... Read More →
KR

Kendall Roark

University of Alberta



Sunday October 26, 2014 1:30pm - 5:30pm EDT
SunTrust Suite, Rialto Center for the Arts, Georgia State University 80 Forsyth St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Monday, October 27
 

7:00am EDT

Breakfast
Breakfast buffet is included Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday in the Conference Dining Room, just off the hotel lobby on the first floor. Simply show your name badge to be seated. Breakfast starts at 6:30 am. Gratuity is included.

If you want to grab a quick bite before heading to a session, continental breakfast is available in the Prefunction area outside our meeting rooms on the second floor, from 7:00-9:00 am.

Monday October 27, 2014 7:00am - 9:00am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

7:00am EDT

Registration
Monday October 27, 2014 7:00am - 5:00pm EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Welcome and Keynote Address
Welcome Remarks
CLIR's president, Charles Henry, will address the sold-out crowd, welcoming everyone to Atlanta and the 2014 DLF Forum. DLF Advisory Committee members, Sarah Shreeves, Jennifer Vinopal, and Max Marmor will provide program updates and news.

Opening Keynote: Bethany Nowviskie

Computing humanist/humane computationalist since 1996. Director of the Scholars’ Lab and Department of Digital Research & Scholarship at the University of Virginia Library and Special Advisor to the Provost, for the advancement of digital humanities research at UVa. Distinguished Presidential Fellow at CLIR, the Council on Library and Information Resources. Immediate past president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities and outgoing chair of both the UVa General Faculty Council and the Modern Language Association‘s Committee on Information Technology. Recent projects include Neatline, the Praxis Program and Praxis Network#Alt-Academy, and the Scholarly Communication Institute. Named one of “Ten Tech Innovators” for 2013 by the Chronicle of Higher Education, which pretty much summed it up: “Bethany Nowviskie likes to build things.” Mother of two; tinkerer; not that kind of doctor. 

Presenters
CH

Charles Henry

President, Council on Library and InformationResources
avatar for Max Marmor

Max Marmor

Arts Professional, Samuel H. Kress Foundation
I'm a former art librarian (UCLA, Columbia, NYU/IFA, Yale) and left librarianship in 2001 to be part of the Mellon Foundation's planning team for ARTstor. In 2007 I moved to the Kress Foundation.
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Dean of Libraries and Professor of English, James Madison University
avatar for Sarah Shreeves

Sarah Shreeves

IDEALS Coordinator / Scholarly Commons Co-Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Jennifer Vinopal

Jennifer Vinopal

Librarian, New York University
digital libraries, digital scholarship, digital humanities, project management, portfolio management, library service development, organizational culture, leadership


Monday October 27, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am EDT
Grand Ballroom Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:30am EDT

Break
Monday October 27, 2014 10:30am - 10:45am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

An All Purpose Archives Viewer: Displaying Large Scale Archival Collections in Digital Libraries + Spotlight: A Self-Service Tool for Showcasing Digital Collections

An All Purpose Archives Viewer: Displaying Large Scale Archival Collections in Digital Libraries
Community Notes
For several years, many academic and research libraries have been exploring ways to scale-up their digitization and web publication of archival collections. These initiatives sought to transfer the methods of mass digitization developed for published materials with the unique, local special collections. 

At UCLA, digitization of complete archival collections has been a goal for a number of years. However, we still didn't know how best to display these digital archives on the web. This spring we decided to draw up functional requirements for an archival collections web interface. Our digital library system is Islandora, so we worked with Discovery Garden, Inc., to build a "Manuscripts Solution Pack." While the solution pack is Islandora specific, the functionality and concepts are not. In our presentation, we will outline the functionalities we chose as integral to an archival interface and then outline the way we technically designed the solution pack. The focus will be on functions and development that are agnostic of the underlying system. In particular, we decided on a content model for archival collections, a web display interface for finding aids alongside digital images and page turning. The page images are zoomable inside the webpage using Open Sea Dragon. 

The goal of our presentation is to offer a conceptual model for the display of archival collections on the web. We will present our findings on the interface's usability and plans for future refinements. We hope during a question and answer period to garner criticism and responses to our approach as well as discuss other models that might be appropriate for this material.

Session Leaders
Elizabeth McAulay, University of California, Los Angeles
Kristian Allen, University of California, Los Angeles

AND

Spotlight: A Self-Service Tool for Showcasing Digital Collections
Community Notes
Like many institutions, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of content in its digital repository. While this repository content is accessible through an integrated discovery environment, librarians, curators, and collection donors often want to showcase individual collections, and faculty, students, and researchers want to work with these collections in a more focused, feature-rich environment that supports their scholarly goals. Purpose-built digital library websites can satisfy these goals, but the time and development resources required to create them limits how often an institution can commit to producing them. 

In this session, we'll describe how SUL addressed this problem by developing a digital library product called Spotlight. Spotlight is a plug-in to Blacklight, an open source Ruby on Rails gem that provides a discovery interface for any Solr index. Combined with Blacklight, an institution can use Spotlight to establish a self-service environment in which librarians, curators, faculty, and others can easily create attractive, feature-rich websites that showcase digital library content of their choosing.

As we'll demonstrate in this session, curators build a Spotlight exhibit completely through web-based forms, using an intuitive workflow of selection and indexing, arrangement, curation, and presentation. Spotlight-based exhibits can include multiple types of media and provide curators with a wide range of "widgets" with which to build pages composed of both digital objects and curatorial content.

Because we believe it has potential value to many institutions, we intentionally designed and developed Spotlight in an open and transparent way. As the project evolves, we're especially interested in facilitating community contributions. We'll conclude this session by describing the steps we're taking to seek regular feedback from peers and stakeholders, generate interest among potential future development partners, and position Spotlight as an open source project that other institutions will adopt and help grow.

Session Leaders
Gary Geisler, Stanford University
Jessie Keck, Stanford University
Stuart Snydman, Stanford University

 


Presenters
avatar for Kristian Allen

Kristian Allen

Programmer Analyst, UCLA
Software Developer - UCLA Digital Library
GG

Gary Geisler

UX Designer, Stanford University
JK

Jessie Keck

Software Developer, Stanford University
avatar for Elizabeth McAulay

Elizabeth McAulay

Interim Head, Digital Library Program, UCLA Digital Library Program
McAulay has worked in the UCLA Digital Library Program for several years as the Librarian for Digital Collection Development and now serving as Interim Head. The UCLA Digital Library Program pursues and publishes digital projects that have international impact.
avatar for Stuart Snydman

Stuart Snydman

Associate Director for Digital Strategy, Stanford University Libraries


Monday October 27, 2014 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

Linked Data for Libraries: From Experimentation to Practice at Scale

Libraries have been moving to embrace linked data for years now, slowly and fitfully it sometimes seems. Now the landscape is firming up as major players have begun committing to well-formed initiatives that move beyond experimentation to practice at scale. This panel presents a view of four diverse, larger-scale, linked data efforts where the “rubber is meeting the road.” Each of the panelists will briefly present an overview of their efforts. A moderated discussion will follow, giving the panelists and audience a chance to compare and contrast approaches, and the larger implications for libraries of this potentially disruptive innovation.

Linked Data for Libraries (LD4L) is a Mellon-funded collaboration of Cornell, Harvard and Stanford libraries that is seeking to leverage the links among bibliographic data, person data (such as from faculty profiles & authority files), and usage data (curation, circulation, citation, etc.) to enhance the usage of scholarly resources. 

OCLC is working with library, education and consumer web organizations to build an infrastructure that makes library data an integral part of the web, producing linked data views of creative works, people, organizations, places, concepts and events. Data from diverse sources is managed in a continually expanding library knowledge graph.

Zepheira are the technical architects of BIBFRAME, and pioneers in Linked Data technology across industries. Libhub is Zepheira's new initiative to make libraries the visible center of credible information where it is most often sought, supporting a leap from current, legacy formats and publishing the embedded resources as library Linked Data.

BIBFLOW is an IMLS-funded project of the UC Davis Library, partnering with Zepheira, to investigate the changes needed and improvements to library technical services workflows afforded by new Web-centric data models and formats such as RDA and BIBFRAME. The project is developing a roadmap and prototypes to accelerate this evolution.

Session Leaders
Jon Corson-Rikert, Cornell University
Carl Stahmer, University of California, Davis
Eric Miller, Zepheira
Roy Tennant, OCLC



Presenters
avatar for Jon Corson-Rikert

Jon Corson-Rikert

VIVO Development Lead, Cornell University
EM

Eric Miller

President, Zepheira Technologies LLC
CG

Carl G Stahmer, PhD

Director of Digital Scholarship, UC Davis
avatar for Roy Tennant

Roy Tennant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research


Monday October 27, 2014 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

Professional Development for Digital Scholarship

In Fall 2012, as part of the Digital Humanities & Libraries THATCamp, discussions among library staff from several institutions ignited brainstorming sessions about training reference and subject librarians for more technically-oriented services offered in emerging and centrally located digital scholarship centers in our libraries. Discussions about professional development methods and approaches are still in the forefront. We propose a moderated panel discussion in which we will explore:

  • Administrative support, staff adoption and cultural shifts in our respective libraries
  • Strengths and weaknesses of professional development models for digital scholarship including format, audience, and implementation realities
  • Modular approaches to implementing training for libraries across the board

The members of this panel have been grappling with the above-questions, and serve as advocates for professional development in our respective libraries while pursuing distinct yet complementary training models:

  • Columbia’s Developing Librarian Project adopted the Praxis model developed at UVa for the training of academic librarians in digital humanities to enable them to serve as first point of reference for and collaborators with faculty and students on digital projects.
  • Duke implemented project- and task-focused training, organized by disciplines to address skills and competencies needed for supporting digital research across the lifecycle.
  • Indiana University’s Research Now: Cross Training for Digital Scholarship initiative follows a praxis-based model with a focus on digital humanities in which digital library staff and reference/subject librarians are learning the domain of each in preparation for the opening of the Scholars’ Commons, Fall 2014.
  • The University of Virginia’s Library Praxis program aims, through digital skill building and ownership of deep research, to better situate librarians as participants in, rather than simply purveyors of, scholarship.

Join our discussion as we explore sensible ways to build institutional capacity in digital scholarship and cross-disciplinary research practices.

Session Leaders
Michelle Dalmau, Indiana University
Catherine Minter, Indiana University
Liz Milewicz, Duke University
Laura Miller, University of Virginia
Trevor Muñoz, University of Maryland (Moderator)
Bob Scott, Columbia University
Sarah Witte, Columbia University


Presenters
avatar for Michelle Dalmau

Michelle Dalmau

Co-Director of the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities / Head of Digital Collections Services, Indiana University
Michelle Dalmau is an Associate Librarian and Head of Digital Collections Services (DCS) at the Indiana University Libraries and Co-Director for the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities (IDAH), a research center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University... Read More →
avatar for Liz Milewicz

Liz Milewicz

Digital Scholarship Services, Duke University Libraries
Project planning, management, and transitioning Internships and other experiential training in digital scholarship Building new forms of literacy (e.g., publishing) into academic courses
LM

Laura Miller

University of Virginia
CM

Catherine Minter

Indiana University
avatar for Trevor Muñoz

Trevor Muñoz

Interim Director, MITH/ Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research, University Libraries, University of Maryland
BS

Bob Scott

Digital Humanities Librarian, Columbia University
SW

Sarah Witte

Columbia University


Monday October 27, 2014 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:00pm EDT

Linked Data Lunch
Grab a box lunch and continue the conversation from the 10:45am Linked Data for Libraries: From Experimentation to Practice at Scale presentation. All are welcome.

Presenters
avatar for Jon Corson-Rikert

Jon Corson-Rikert

VIVO Development Lead, Cornell University
EM

Eric Miller

President, Zepheira Technologies LLC
CG

Carl G Stahmer, PhD

Director of Digital Scholarship, UC Davis
avatar for Roy Tennant

Roy Tennant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research


Monday October 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:00pm EDT

Applied Altmetrics: Implementations and Uses within an Institution - Lunch

Grab a box lunch before joining this session.

As monitoring and reporting on the wider societal impact of research rises higher in the agenda for many institutions, we take a look at the burgeoning altmetrics movement, and examine how it can be useful in gathering this evidence.

Unlike traditional measures of impact such as citation and download counts, which typically take a long time to accrue, altmetrics offer much more immediate insight into how the research is received and used.

By tracking online mentions and links to an article we are able to determine whether it is reported in the mainstream news, blogged about by an enthusiast, shared across social media, or goes on to be incorporated into future policy and patent proposals. We disambiguate between different versions of the same article to present collated, fully auditable data for each publication. Such information can be incredibly valuable for an institution in measuring the broader impact of its research.

In this session we will explore some of the ways in which institutions can integrate altmetrics into their existing platforms, and in doing so provide greater support and feedback for their researchers.

Session Leader
Sara Rouhi, Altmetric


Presenters
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director of Engagement & Advocacy for Altmetric and Dimensions, Digital Science
Sara Rouhi is Director of Engagement & Advocacy for Dimensions with responsibility for education and outreach in the US and Canada for both Digital Science’s new Dimensions platform and Digital Science’s alternative metrics company, Altmetric. She... Read More →


Monday October 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:00pm EDT

From Zero to 60: Lessons Learned From Setting Up Digital Initiatives in Small to Mid-sized Academic Institutions - Lunch

Grab a box lunch before joining this session.

Have you started a new job at a small liberal arts college—and are suddenly responsible for establishing a digital repository? Do your needs and service demands exceed your staffing capability? Did you wish that you could have had more time to design a strategic plan before taking the plunge into providing digital program services? Or are you just curious as to what happens when a small archives or library is placed under these kinds of constraints?

In this three-part panel, speakers from small to mid-sized academic institutions will describe how they initiated digital initiatives within a short time frame with limited resources, what kinds of challenges were encountered, how they chose to address those challenges, and the outcome of that process. Following the presentation, the speakers will discuss common trends across the case studies, past mistakes, potential strategies and how their experiences affect future plans for their respective institutions. During the last section, attendees will be asked to design their own solutions to the scenarios presented by collaborating in speaker-guided groups.

Session Leaders
Eugenia Kim, Emerson College
Cinda May, Indiana State University
Sasha Griffin, Denison University


Presenters
avatar for Sasha Griffin

Sasha Griffin

University Archivist & Special Collections Librarian, Denison University
Sasha Griffin is the University Archivist and Special Collections Librarian at Denison University in Granville, Ohio. Previously, Sasha has held the positions of Interim College Archivist, Digital Archivist, and Project Cataloging Archivist at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. Sasha... Read More →
EK

Eugenia Kim

Digital Archivist, Emerson College
CM

Cinda May

Indiana State University


Monday October 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference E Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:00pm EDT

Lunch Buffet
Enjoy the large selection and excellent fare at the Conference Dining Hall on Level 1.

Monday October 27, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference Dining Hall Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center (Level 1)

1:30pm EDT

Building a Community of Practice for Research Data Services: Experience of CLIR/DLF E-Research Peer Networking & Mentoring Group

From March to October 2014, eight academic libraries in the United States and Canada participated in the CLIR/DLF E-Research Peer Networking & Mentoring Group (ERPNMG), a program that aimed at encouraging and building a self-reliant, mutually supportive community engaged in continuous learning about e-research support. The program consisted of a series of webinars, practical activities and virtual discussions that helped the participating institutions to evaluate, refine and further implement their research data services (RDS). In this panel the ERPNMG participants, including the library representatives and the facilitators who worked with them, will share their experiences and discuss the successes and challenges of implementing research data services while engaging in mutual learning as well as propose the next steps for the ERPNMG after the end of program. We will place our experiences in the conceptual context of communities of practice (CoP) and encourage the audience to discuss the needs and opportunities for emerging communities of practice around data.

By receiving questions, comments, and suggestions from the wider community at the DLF Forum, we hope to collectively reflect on the role of the libraries and ERPNMG in building CoPs in the RDS context and better understand overlaps, interactions and possibly tensions among various sub-communities.

Session Leaders
Mayu Ishida, University of Manitoba
Chris Kollen, University of Arizona
Sarah Williams, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Kathleen Fear, University of Rochester
Inna Kouper, Indiana University
Kendall Roark, University of Alberta


Presenters
KF

Kathleen Fear

University of Rochester
MI

Mayu Ishida

Research Services Librarian, University of Manitoba
CK

Chris Kollen

Data Curation Librarian, University of Arizona
avatar for Inna Kouper

Inna Kouper

Indiana University
avatar for Sarah C. Williams

Sarah C. Williams

Life Sciences Data Services Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Monday October 27, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

1:30pm EDT

Catastrophic Success: The Challenges and Opportunities of Supporting Digital Scholarship at Liberal Arts Colleges

Liberal arts colleges (LACs) are not newcomers to the world of digital scholarship, and we benefit from several strengths: close working relationships among faculty, students, librarians, and technologists; a history of faculty-student collaboration; and fewer administrative layers than larger institutions. In this panel, we will explore models for engaging with digital scholarship in the LAC library context. The panelists come from a range of small undergraduate institutions that have taken different approaches to supporting digital scholarship. Among our panelists' schools, Digital Scholarship has grown out of special collections, technical services/systems, research & instruction services, and visual resources. But each of our libraries now focuses explicitly on digital scholarship as an area of engagement, staffing and programming. This panel discussion about the interests and challenges of supporting digital scholarship at LACs will provide fresh insight to the DLF community, which has more traditionally been focused on the perspective of large research libraries.

While our scale is different, we use many of the same tools and methods as larger research libraries. However, there are also some key differences. For example, digital scholarship at LACs, whether in the classroom or as part of faculty research, typically incorporates the undergraduate student learning experience in ways that R1 institutions may not. The panelists will discuss: approaches to collaborating on faculty research projects; ways that undergraduate students can engage as partners in digital scholarship work, within their coursework, as part of research assistant/internships, or as student workers; staffing for DS at our institutions; and questions of organizational and technical sustainability at both the project and staffing levels. Finally, we'll talk about ways that LACs are collaborating across institutions, including creating the "Manifesto on Digital Scholarship at Liberal Arts Colleges" and efforts to develop a common open source technological infrastructure.

Session Leaders
Kelcy Shepherd, Amherst College
Laurie Allen, Haverford College
Eric Luhrs, Lafayette College
Gina Siesing, Bryn Mawr College
Jennifer Vinopal, New York University


Presenters
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Eric Luhrs

Eric Luhrs

Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College
Eric Luhrs is the Director of Digital Scholarship Services at Skillman Library, Lafayette College, where he leads a team of specialist librarians, a CLIR post-doc, and a VR curator responsible for designing and building digital research projects with faculty partners, developing and... Read More →
avatar for Kelcy Shepherd

Kelcy Shepherd

Associate Deputy Director for Discretionary Programs, IMLS
GS

Gina Siesing

Bryn Mawr College
avatar for Jennifer Vinopal

Jennifer Vinopal

Librarian, New York University
digital libraries, digital scholarship, digital humanities, project management, portfolio management, library service development, organizational culture, leadership


Monday October 27, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

1:30pm EDT

Hydra Installfest

For developers who are new to Hydra and/or Ruby on Rails development, we'll set up a development environment, talk about development tools, and give you everything you'll need to dive into Hydra, in our introductory Developing with Hydra workshop.

Session Leader
Bess Sadler, Stanford University


Presenters
avatar for Bess Sadler

Bess Sadler

Sr. Develpoer, Data Curation Experts
Talk to me about building data repositories and discovery applications! Blacklight, Samvera, solr, custom data migration, agile software development, scalability and performance -- Stop by the DCE table in the vendor's area and tell me about your digital library goals.


Monday October 27, 2014 1:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

2:30pm EDT

Snapshots - Group A

Snapshots are 7-minute presentations meant to engage and energize the audience. Presenters are asked to give a dynamic overview of their topic in a quick timeframe, with up to 24 slides. Snapshot presentations are grouped together based on an over-arching theme or idea. There are four groups (A, B, C, and D) of snapshots at the 2014 DLF Forum.


Problems and Solutions for Ingest of Humanities Articles into Institutional Repositories
Nathan Hall, Virginia Tech University

A number of authors (Madsen & Oleen, 2013) and projects (http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/hoap/Filling_the_repository) have documented some different methods for finding and efficiently processing research articles for ingest into institutional repositories. These sometimes involve using subscription-based tools such as Web of Science or SCOPUS. In addition to being subscription-based, these have the limitation of having less coverage in humanities and social science publications. This session will explore new avenues for exposing article level metadata in humanities journals in order to find publications to improve under-represented subject areas in institutional repositories.


Curating Menus: Digesting Data for Critical Humanistic Inquiry
Katie Rawson, University of Pennsylvania

This snapshot assesses of the construction and presentation of a humanistic data set. It explores provenance and categorization through the Curating Menus project (http://www.curatingmenus.org/), which uses NYPL's What's On the Menu and the Frank E. Buttolph menu collection and papers. Data curation is necessarily an act of cultural construction, and this project provides a lens to concretely and critically engage the effects of this construction. This snapshot examines the physical and intellectual work of curating and indexing the data and proposes methods for presenting data sets that foreground the context of their construction.


User Engagement with Digital Archives: A Case Study of Emblematica Online
Harriett Green, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Myung-Ja Han, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mara Wade, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Tim Cole, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

This snapshot will present preliminary findings on a user study of Emblematica Online, a digital humanities project currently funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities to build a multi-institutional archive of digitized Renaissance emblem books. From the interview data gathered for the user study, the research update will examine user needs for granular discovery and access in digital collections, and how Emblematica Online has developed unique strategies and metadata applications through collaboration with expert scholars in the curation of the digital archive.



Bridging the Gap in Digital Collections: Application of 360 Degree Photography in Enhancing End-User Interfaces

Kinza Masood, University of Utah

The Marriott Library has been struggling to provide its end users with an experience that is rich, fulfilling, and interactive. The library has recently established a workflow that connects a camera to a rotating turntable, placed in a tent resembling a translucent igloo, with controlled lighting. By capturing a series of images of an artifact, placed on the turntable, and stitching them together, the end product is an interactive JavaScript file that the user can turn around virtually, and look at from all sides. A comprehensive description of Marriott's technology and application of this workflow is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUfohvRyZfU&feature=youtu.be



Florida Islandora: Challenges and Rewards of Collaborative Development & Implementation

Katie McCormick, Florida State University
Jean Phillips, Florida State University
Lee Dotson, University of Central Florida

This panel will present some of the challenges and rewards of collaborative development and implementation of Islandora as a common digital platform for Florida's state universities and colleges. The panel will discuss lessons learned from the migration of content from previous systems and the launch of the new Islandora-based sites. The panelists will also discuss how work occurs in an environment of continuous development. The presentation will also touch on the continued development for a statewide collection landing page for collaborative shared digital collections which will replace the current Publication of Archival Library & Museum Materials (PALMM) interface.


Presenters
TW

Timothy W. Cole

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lee Dotson

Lee Dotson

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Central Florida
Lee Dotson is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. She has been the manager of STARS, UCF’s digital institutional repository, since it went live in the summer of 2015 and has had the opportunity to work with digital projects and repositories... Read More →
avatar for Harriett Green

Harriett Green

Associate University Librarian, Washington University in St. Louis
I am the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services at Washington University in St. Louis.
avatar for Nathan Hall

Nathan Hall

Director, Digital Imaging and Preservation, Virginia Tech
I am an associate professor at Virginia Tech, where I direct digital imaging and digital preservation services for the University Libraries. I am PI on the IMLS funded project, Community Development Model For Digital Community Archives. I am interested in equitable partnerships... Read More →
MK

Myung-Ja K. Han

Professor/Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
MJ is the Professor/Metadata Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on interoperability of metadata, metadata modeling, bibliographic control in the digital library, and the use of Linked Open Data in library service architectures and im... Read More →
KM

Kinza Masood

University of Utah
KM

Katie McCormick

Associate Dean for Special Collections & Archives, Florida State University
JP

Jean Phillips

Florida State University
avatar for Katie Rawson

Katie Rawson

Coordinator for Digital Research, University of Pennsylvania
Katie Rawson works with faculty, students, and staff to develop digital projects and assess emerging tools and technologies for humanities research. She also manages the British and American Literature collection and serves as a liaison to the English department. Katie has a... Read More →
MW

Mara Wade

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Monday October 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

2:30pm EDT

Piloting a Peer-to-Peer Process for Becoming a Trusted Digital Repository + The Future of Fedora: Update on Fedora 4
Two project updates:

Piloting a Peer-to-Peer Process for Becoming a Trusted Digital Repository
Community Notes
In this presentation, representatives from UF and UNT will share on their work in collaboratively creating a pilot peer-to-peer process for TRAC to build towards becoming a Trusted Digital Repository, and how the process supports other concerns including needs for different types of collaborations and scales of collaboration for achieving TRAC goals, with peer-to-peer style collaboration for peer review of TRAC offering an important option for building capacity locally and as a community. 

In 2014 the University of Florida (UF) and the University of North Texas (UNT) began a collaborative process to each complete a full self-audit using the Trusted Repository Audit Checklist (TRAC) for both institution's digital repositories. In addition to the self-audit, each institution agreed to participate in a peer review process evaluating and scoring each other's self-audit and supplied documentation. 

The goals of the project are as follows:

  • Document the current repository services and systems, technical and human infrastructures, and overall operations following the TRAC process
  • Demonstrate the maturity of repository services, infrastructure and governance at both institutions
  • Share information and knowledge to support increasing the collaboration between project teams at UF and UNT
  • Pilot a peer review option that aims at offers more rigor and external feedback than a self-audit, but which also does not have the same financial requirements as a full external certification by a third party
  • Leverage the process internally at each institution to share information and knowledge to support increasing collaboration among different internal and external groups, including Research Computing and High Performance Computing groups at each institution

Session Leaders
Laurie Taylor, University of Florida
Chelsea Dinsmore, University of Florida
Suchi Yellapantula, University of Florida
Mark Phillips, University of North Texas

AND

The Future of Fedora: Update on Fedora 4 
Community Notes
Over the past eighteen months, the Fedora community has come together to redesign and rebuild Fedora as a robust repository platform for the next decade. This new version of the software, Fedora 4, introduces a number of sought-after features, including performance improvements, support for large files, and native linked data capabilities. The codebase has also been revitalized to take advantage of modern, best-practice coding standards, including rigorous testing and documentation. The first official release, Fedora 4.0, launched as a beta at Open Repositories in July of 2014, and the full release will be available later in the year.

This presentation will provide an update on Fedora 4, both in terms of community support and technical development. Attendees will learn about the new Fedora 4.0 feature set, as well as use cases and strategies for migrating from Fedora 3.x to Fedora 4.

Session Leader
Mike Durbin, University of Virginia

 

Presenters
avatar for Chelsea Dinsmore

Chelsea Dinsmore

Curator for Digital Collections, University of Florida
MP

Mark Phillips

Associate Dean for Digital Libraries, University of North Texas
Mark Phillips is the Associate Dean for Digital Libraries at the UNT Libraries. His areas of interest include: workflows for digitized and born-digital content, digital preservation systems, Web archives, and metadata quality.
avatar for Laurie Taylor

Laurie Taylor

Senior Director for Library Technology and Digital Strategies, University of Florida
SY

Suchi Yellapantula

University of Florida


Monday October 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

2:30pm EDT

Researcher Identifiers—What's in a Name (or URI)? + SHARE: An Update on the SHared Access Research Ecosystem

Two project updates:

Researcher Identifiers—What's in a Name (or URI)?
Community Notes
A number of approaches to providing authoritative researcher identifiers have emerged, but they tend to be limited by discipline, affiliation or publisher. The rise of bibliometrics and its extension, altmetrics—the attempt to measure the impact of a work including mentions in social media and news media—strengthens the need to uniquely identify researchers and correctly associate them with their scholarly output. Both institutions and researchers have a stake in ensuring their scholarly output is accurately represented across academia and the web. It is time for universities to transition from watchful waiting to engagement.

It is difficult to uniquely identify researchers when they have not authored monographs, but write primarily journal articles, and thus are not represented in national name authority files. An OCLC Research Task Group comprising specialists from the US, the UK, and the Netherlands (see http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/registering-researchers.html#taskgroup) developed eighteen use-case scenarios around different stake-holders, generated a list of functional requirements derived from these use case scenarios, and profiled 20 research networking systems. A researcher ID information flow diagram illustrates the complexity of the current ecosystem. The same information about a specific researcher may be represented in multiple databases, and only a subset interoperates with each other.

This presentation will summarize emerging adoption trends and focus on three identifiers—­ISNI, ORCID and VIAF. Participants will be asked to comment on the recommendations targeted to librarians, researchers and university administrators and share their experiences with or plans for researcher identifiers at their institutions.

Session Leader
Karen Smith-Yoshimura, OCLC Research

AND

SHARE: An Update on the SHared Access Research Ecosystem
Community Notes
An update on the latest developments with SHARE, a higher education and research community initiative to facilitate the preservation of, access to, and reuse of research outputs. Learn the status of the project’s first undertaking, the SHARE Notification Service, which aims to notify interested stakeholders when research release events occur. Currently in prototype development, the SHARE Notification Service is working with funding agencies, sponsored research offices, institutional repositories, disciplinary repositories, publishers, data archives, and other interested parties to provide a timely, structured, and comprehensive communication channel. Presentation will describe how the SHARE Notification Service can be used by researchers to keep interested parties apprised of their scholarly output; by universities to facilitate the work of the sponsored research office, tenure and promotion committees, and to oversee open access polices; by funding agencies to track grant compliance; and by libraries to help populate their institutional repositories.

The presentation will also touch on SHARE’s larger vision of a coordinated repository infrastructure that will give campus-driven research outputs their widest exposure, and facilitate their broad reuse. In its fully realized state, SHARE will provide a registry of what is available within publicly accessible repositories and facilitate discovery of, and access to, content across these repositories. SHARE will expose this content so that the community can reuse, mine, and build services on top of the corpus. We look forward to detailing this vision and getting your critical input as we pursue this community-driven project.

Session Leader
Eric Celeste, SHARE




Presenters
avatar for Eric Celeste

Eric Celeste

Consultant, Tenseg
I have been working with REA on its website and other technology since 2010. My son, Alex, and I run a technology consulting company, Tenseg LLC, together.


Monday October 27, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:30pm EDT

Break
Monday October 27, 2014 3:30pm - 3:45pm EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

Snapshots - Group B
Snapshots are 7-minute presentations meant to engage and energize the audience. Presenters are asked to give a dynamic overview of their topic in a quick timeframe, with up to 24 slides. Snapshot presentations are grouped together based on an over-arching theme or idea. There are four groups (A, B, C, and D) of snapshots at the 2014 DLF Forum.

Researcher Expectations From Data Publication and Peer Review
John Kratz, California Digital Library

Data "publication" attempts to appropriate for data the prestige of publication in the scholarly literature. While the scholarly communication community substantially endorses the idea, it hasn't fully resolved what a data publication should look like or how data peer review should work. To contribute an important and neglected perspective on these issues, we surveyed ~250 researchers across the sciences and social sciences, asking what expectations "data publication" raises and what features would be useful to evaluate the trustworthiness and impact of a data publication and the contribution of its creator(s).


#Win or #Fail? Measuring Researcher Attitudes toward Open Data Using Sentiment Analysis of Twitter

Sara Mannheimer, Montana State University

In the past few years, open data policies have become more common. Much federally-funded research data must now be preserved and shared, and many academic journals now require that supporting data be made available. However, the open data trend has not met with universal approval from the research community. The debate surrounding PLOS's March 2014 open data policy was especially visible on Twitter, where the hashtag #PLOSfail was used by detractors. By conducting a sentiment analysis on a subset of Twitter, we measure researcher attitudes toward open data over time, identifying general trends in public opinion surrounding open data.


Faculty Attitudes Towards Data Sharing

Nathan Hall, Virginia Tech University

This snapshot explores faculty attitudes towards data sharing. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews at two large public universities. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed with NVivo. Emerging themes were the main findings. Findings include the participants' attitudes and behaviors towards data sharing, along with the cultural norms, and organizational and economic incentives behind those attitudes and behaviors.


Learning Together: Two Case Studies of Internal Data Management Training

Elizabeth Rolando, Georgia Tech
Christopher Eaker, University of Tennessee Knoxville

As the Georgia Tech and University of Tennessee libraries expand data management and archiving services, internal training is critically important. At Georgia Tech, the Research Data Librarian collaborated with subject librarians to explore local disciplinary metadata and documentation practices for research data collections. At the University of Tennessee, the Data Curation Librarian held an interactive workshop to introduce subject specialist and instructional librarians to research data management best practices. This panel will discuss the two methods for "training the trainer"—lecture-style instruction vs. active, hands-on participation—highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches.


The CRADLE Project: Building a National Network of Data Curation Educators

Helen Tibbo, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

The IMLS-funded Creating Research Assets and Data using Lifecycle Education (CRADLE) project is working to enhance data curation education for librarians, archivists, and researchers by developing massive open online courses (MOOC) that will provide instruction on data curation principles. This presentation will focus on the efforts aimed at library and archival information professionals and seek community input on developing assignments that require MOOC students to make contact with data producers and information professionals at their local universities, libraries, research centers, or data repositories. Hosting virtual summits that provide ongoing opportunities to share data management experiences and continue will be discussed.


Presenters
avatar for Christopher Eaker

Christopher Eaker

Data Curation Librarian, University of Tennessee
Christopher Eaker is Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Libraries. He is interested in scientific data curation and in integrating sound data stewardship skills into science and engineering curricula. Christopher helps UTK’s researchers navigate... Read More →
avatar for Nathan Hall

Nathan Hall

Director, Digital Imaging and Preservation, Virginia Tech
I am an associate professor at Virginia Tech, where I direct digital imaging and digital preservation services for the University Libraries. I am PI on the IMLS funded project, Community Development Model For Digital Community Archives. I am interested in equitable partnerships... Read More →
avatar for John Kratz

John Kratz

UX Designer, California Digital Library
avatar for Sara Mannheimer

Sara Mannheimer

Data Librarian, Montana State University
As Associate Professor and Data Librarian at Montana State University, I help shape practices and theories for curation, publication, and preservation of data. My research is rooted in the examination of the social, ethical, and technical issues that arise as we—as a profession... Read More →
ER

Elizabeth Rolando

Research Data Librarian, Georgia Institute of Technology
HT

Helen Tibbo

Alumni Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Dr. Helen R. Tibbo is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), and teaches in the areas of archives and records management, digital preservation and access, appraisal, trustworthy... Read More →


Monday October 27, 2014 3:45pm - 5:15pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

Sustaining Open Source Software

Open source software has become increasingly popular in the library domain for many reasons: its low out-of-pocket cost, the availability of the source code, the ability to contribute to development of the software product, and the ability to participate in likeminded communities taking root around the open source software. This increase in interest has led to an increase in the ability of the projects to tap their user base for the contributions necessary to sustain the software, benefitting both the project and its community. Software managers have a stable business environment for maintaining the software and planning future development and users are more assured that the software will continue to evolve to meet their needs and that their investment is guarded.

There is no standard recipe for sustaining an open source software project and each successful project has taken a slightly different tack. In this proposed panel discussion, representatives from the following seven software projects will provide a seven minute overview of the sustainability measures their project has put in place: ArchivesSpace, Archivematica, BitCurator, CollectionSpace, DuraSpace, Hydra, and Islandora. Each representative will highlight the longevity of the project, the phases of development of sustainability for the project, advantages and disadvantages of the project's sustainability measures, and, finally, planned improvement to the sustainability measures. The last forty-minutes of the session will be reserved for questions from and discussion with session attendees.

Session Leaders
Sibyl Schaefer, Rockefeller Archives Center
Bradley Westbrook, ArchivesSpace
Mark Leggot, DiscoveryGarden/Islandora
Mike Giarlo, Penn State University
Cal Lee, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Angela Spinazzè, CollectionSpace
Michele Kimpton, DuraSpace
Evelyn McClellan, Artefactual Systems


Presenters
A

ArchivesSpace

Program Manager, ArchivesSpace
ArchivesSpace (www.archivesspace.org) is the next-generation web-based archives information management system, designed by archivists and supported by diverse archival repositories. ArchivesSpace is an open source, web application for managing archives information.
MG

Mike Giarlo

Digital Library Architect, Penn State University
CL

Cal Lee

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Mark Leggott

Mark Leggott

Executive Director, Research Data Canada
Executive Director of Research Data Canada, a stakeholder organization dedicated to developing a sustainable approach to research data management in Canada.
JM

Jonathan Markow

Chief Strategy Officer, DuraSpace
avatar for Evelyn McLellan

Evelyn McLellan

Systems Archivist & Metadata Specialist, Artefactual Systems
Evelyn is a Systems Archivist at Artefactual Systems, a company that develops open-source software for the GLAM sector. She has a deep interest in open-source software and community collaboration. Evelyn has an MAS from U of British Columbia.
avatar for Sibyl Schaefer

Sibyl Schaefer

Digital Preservation Analst, UC San Diego
avatar for Angela Spinazze

Angela Spinazze

Owner/Founder, ATSPIN consulting
I work at the intersection of the arts, technology, civic engagement, and facilitation. Recently, I became a Certified ToP Facilitator (CTF) and this is my first time attending a ToP Network Annual Gathering. Talk to me about archive and museum-making, community-designed software... Read More →


Monday October 27, 2014 3:45pm - 5:15pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

Managing the Digitization of Large Press Archives + Audio and Video at Scale: Indiana University's Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative + Building a Ten-Campus Digital Library Collection at the University of California
Three project updates:

Managing the Digitization of Large Press Archives
Community Notes
Managing the digitization of press material is quite a challenge; not only in terms of quantity, but also in terms of text and material quality, designing the workflow system which organizes the operations, and handling the metadata. This challenge has been the focus of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina's digitization work during the past year in the course of its partnership with the Center for Economic, Judicial, and Social Study and Documentation (CEDEJ). Having more than 800,000 pages of press articles to be digitally preserved and publicly accessed, triggered an inevitable need to design a workflow that can manage such a massive collection and handle its attributes proficiently. The deployment of this endeavor required simultaneous intervention of four main aspects; data analysis of the collection, developing a digitization workflow for the collection at hand, implementing and installing the necessary software tools for metadata entry, and finally, publishing the digital archive online for researchers and public access.


The presentation will demonstrate the workflow system which is being implemented to manage this massive press collection, which has yielded to date more than 400,000 pages. It will shed some light on the BA's Digital Assets Factory (DAF), which is the nucleus upon which the digitization process of CEDEJ collection has been built. Additionally, the presentation will discuss the tools implemented for ingesting data into the digitization process starting form indexing until the creation of batches that are ingested into the system. The outflow will also be discussed in terms of organizing and grouping multipart press clips, in addition to the reviewing, validation and correction of the output. Light will also be shed on the challenges encountered to associate the accessible online archive with a powerful search engine supporting multidimensional search while maintaining a user-friendly navigation experience.

Session Leaders
Bassem Elsayed, Bibliotheca Alexandrina
Ahmed Samir, Bibliotheca Alexandrina

AND

Audio and Video at Scale: Indiana University's Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative
Community Notes
In 2013, Indiana University (IU) launched a five-year project, known as the Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative (MDPI: http://mdpi.iu.edu/), to digitize and preserve over 300,000 audio and video assets of value from across the university. Among academic institutions, IU has an unusually rich collection of rare and unique time-based media that document subjects of enduring value to the university, State of Indiana, and the world. Pieces range from wax cylinder sound recordings of Native American music to performances by notable graduates of its Jacobs School of Music to media from the collections of IU's Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction.

The project is co-led by IU's Vice President for Information Technology and Dean of University Libraries. IU is partnering with a commercial vendor, Memnon Archiving Services of Belgium, to set up a facility in Bloomington, Indiana to digitize these materials, in a workflow that will produce as much as 12 terabytes per day of digital data to be preserved beginning in summer 2014.

MDPI was planned out of recognition by IU leadership that large portions of IU's media holdings were becoming seriously endangered due to media degradation and/or format obsolescence. A 2008-2009 survey of holdings at IU Bloomington (http://www.indiana.edu/~medpres/documents/iub_media_preservation_survey_FINALwww.pdf) uncovered over 569,000 audiovisual items on 51 different physical formats held in collections of 80 different organizational units across the campus, with significant quantities of rare and unique items in danger of becoming inaccessible within 5-15 years due to degradation or obsolescence.

In this presentation, we will outline the goals and history of MDPI, describe the workflows that we are establishing to feed content into the digitization process and manage content coming out of the process, and discuss planned strategies for preservation storage, access, and metadata.

Session Leaders
Juliet Hardesty, Indiana University
Jon Dunn, Indiana University

AND

Building a Ten-Campus Digital Library Collection at the University of California
Community Notes
The University of California (UC) Libraries and the California Digital Library are nearing the conclusion of an ambitious project to build a shared system for creating, managing, and providing access to unique digital resources across ten campuses (see http://bit.ly/UCLDC).

The platform we are creating will have three major components: 1) a shared digital asset management system for librarians to centrally add and edit digital files and metadata, 2) a metadata harvest for digital resources hosted on external platforms, and 3) an integrated public interface so end-users can seamlessly search across these disparate resources. Together, these components will provide critical infrastructure for the UC Libraries to more efficiently, economically, and collaboratively manage and surface digital content. We will also be leveraging this platform to participate in the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), and we are investigating the possibility of extending it to facilitate participation in DPLA by additional libraries, archives, and museums throughout California.

This session will build on a "Community Idea Exchange" poster presentation from the 2013 Forum—at which point we had just begun the project—to describe in more depth the components of the platform and the technologies employed, as well as challenges to and changes in our approach since we embarked. One of the more interesting aspects of our technology stack is that we have opted to license and customize a vendor product for the digital asset management system with which the digital library community may not have much familiarity (Nuxeo, http://www.nuxeo.com/), and in this session we will discuss our experiences with it. We will also describe how our project and our platform will connect with other initiatives, most notably the DPLA, and may provide a piece of the technical infrastructure needed for institutions across California to share their respective digital resources.

Session Leaders
Sherri Berger, California Digital Library
Brian Tingle, California Digital Library

 


 

Presenters
SB

Sherri Berger

Product Manager for Special Collections, California Digital Library
Sherri Berger is Product Manager for Special Collections at the California Digital Library. She leads and participates in collaborative projects that provide greater access to digital collections throughout California.
avatar for Jon Dunn

Jon Dunn

Assistant Dean for Library Technologies, Indiana University Bloomington Libraries
BE

Bassem Elsayed

Project Manager, Bibliotheca Alexandrina
AS

Ahmed Samir

Bibliotheca Alexandrina
avatar for Brian Tingle

Brian Tingle

Technical Lead for Digital Special Collections, California Digital Library
wandered into the library 20 years ago and never left


Monday October 27, 2014 3:45pm - 5:15pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

5:15pm EDT

Community Idea Exchange (Posters) & Reception

Join us for the opening reception and the Community Idea Exchange. Cocktails and light fare will be served. Your first drink is on DLF, then it's a cash bar.

The Community Idea Exchange is made up of Posters and a Lightning Round. Fast-paced and fun, the Lightning Round gives each presenter one minute to pitch their poster to the conference audience. There is also dedicated time in the program for attendees to visit with poster presenters.

The CIE will be part of the evening reception on Monday, October 27, 5:15-8:00 pm. The Lightning Round will start at 5:30. Like last year, attendees can vote for their favorite poster. The winning poster presenter gets a 2015 DLF Forum registration, and a voter is randomly selected to also win 2015 registration.


2014 DLF Forum Posters

A-sides, B-sides, Chapters, and Special Features: Describing Content and Structure in Avalon Media System

Juliet Hardesty, Indiana University

Archival Alliance: Moving Legacy Finding Aids to ArchivesSpace as a Multi-Department Library Collaboration
Paromita Biswas, Western Carolina University
Elizabeth Skene, Western Carolina University

DataNet Federation Consortium: A Policy-driven Architecture for Preservation, Federation, and Discovery
Michael Conway, DICE Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Hao Xu, DICE Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

The Developing Librarian Project
Sarah Witte, Columbia University
Robert Scott, Columbia Unviersity
Alex Gil, Columbia University
Meredith Levin, Columbia University

Expanding Conventional Collection Boundaries Through Visualization
Justin Schell, University of Minnesota
Amy Neeser, University of Minnesota
Steven Braun, University of Minnesota
Megan Lafferty, University of Minnesota

Experience Content - With CCS's New MagicBox
Hartmut Janczikowski, CCS

Improved Access through Preservation Grade Imaging
Carol Wilczewski, Digital Transitions

Framing a Repository Solution for Bio-Imaging Data
Kyle Bannerjee, Oregon Health & Science University
Robin Champieux, Oregona Health & Science University

From Field to Footnote: A Case Study in the Management of Archaeological Data
Stephen Davison, University of California, Los Angeles
Willeke Wendrich, University of California, Los Angeles

Hybrid Permissions Models to Integrate Free and For-Fee Content into Patron Workflows
Andrea Eastman-Mullins, Alexander Street Press

Improving the Efficiency and Quality of Digitization Practice: A Collaborative and Research-based Approach to Promoting Change
Drew Krewer, University of Houston
Annie Wu, University of Houston

The James Merrill Digital Archive: Channeling the Collaborative Spirit(s)
Shannon Davis, Washington University in St. Louis
Joel Minor, Washington University in St. Louis

Large-Scale Manuscript Digitization in a Medium-Sized Institution: Metadata Repurposing, Mapping, and Workflows
Dawn Schmitz, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Joseph Nicholson, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Rita Johnston, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Lowering the Barrier to Open Source Repositories: DSpaceDirect at Bennington College
Carissa Smith, DuraSpace

New Features in the ALTO XML Standard
Frederick Zarndt, Global Connexions
Luis Baquera, University of California, Riverside 

Paper Seismograms Shake Up Research Data Workflows at Georgia Tech
Elizabeth Rolando, Georgia Tech
Katie Gentilello, Georgia Tech
Wendy Hagenmaier, Georgia Tech

Points of Access: Integrating Digital Scholarship Services Across the Research Life Cycle
Christopher Eaker, University of Tennessee
Ashley Maynor, University of Tennessee

Populating the Archipelago: Repository-Backed Research Applications with Islandora
Eric Luhrs, Lafayette College
James Griffin, Lafayette College
Thomas Goodnow, Lafayette College

Research Now: Cross Training for Digital Scholarship
Angela Courtney, Indiana University
Michelle Dalmau, Indiana University
Catherine Minter, Indiana University 

The Road to Implementing Successful Research Data Services: Moving from Challenges to Benefits
Ixchel Faniel, OCLC Research
Lynn Connaway, OCLC Research

Supplementary Materials: Investigating Their Persistence and Exploring the Library's Role
Sarah Williams, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Support Open Access Policies Through Publications Harvesting and Repository Integration
Kelcy Rosell, Symplectic

Take the Omeka Dashboard for a Test Drive
Susan Chesley Perry, University of California, Santa Cruz
Jess Waggoner, University of California, Santa Cruz

Techniques for Descriptive Metadata Enrichment of Digital Objects
Carrick Rogers, Stanford University
Gary Geisler, Stanford University
Trina Purcell, Revs Institute

Usability Metrics of Web-Based Mapping Applications
Tao Zhang, Purdue University
Nicole Kong, Purdue University
Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue University

Using BIBFRAME, Flask, and Fedora4 as a Catalog Pull Platform
Jeremy Nelson, Colorado College

Where's My Funding? Common Pitfalls for Researchers in Meeting the NIH Public Access Requirement
Gail Steinhart, Cornell University
Sarah Young, Cornell University

Where's My Syllabus?
Ann Caldwell, Brown University

 


Presenters
avatar for Ashley R. Maynor (she/her)

Ashley R. Maynor (she/her)

Co-Founder & Program Director | The Library Collective, Director of the Library Lab | NYU Libraries
Ashley Maynor is an award-winning filmmaker, librarian, and scholar who uses technology to tell compelling stories. At NYU Libraries, she is founding director of the Library Lab, developing a curated series of pop-up spaces, events, workshops, trainings, projects, and initiatives... Read More →
avatar for Luis Baquera

Luis Baquera

Manager of Computing Services, University of California, Riverside
PB

Paromita Biswas

UCLA Library
SB

Steven Braun

Informatics/Data Services Specialist, University of Minnesota Libraries
AC

Ann Caldwell

Head, Imaging & Metadata Services, Brown University
avatar for Robin Champieux

Robin Champieux

Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
I am the Research Engagement & Open Science Librarian at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland Oregon. In that capacity, I work to understand the everyday practices and goals of biomedical researchers and students in order to advance the uptake of open scientific workflows... Read More →
DC

Dawn Childress

Librarian, Digital Collections and Scholarship, UCLA
avatar for Lynn Connaway

Lynn Connaway

OCLC Research
MC

Michael Conway

DICE Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Angela Courtney

Angela Courtney

Head, Arts and Humanities Department, Indiana University
avatar for Michelle Dalmau

Michelle Dalmau

Co-Director of the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities / Head of Digital Collections Services, Indiana University
Michelle Dalmau is an Associate Librarian and Head of Digital Collections Services (DCS) at the Indiana University Libraries and Co-Director for the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities (IDAH), a research center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University... Read More →
SD

Stephen Davison

University of California, Los Angeles
avatar for Christopher Eaker

Christopher Eaker

Data Curation Librarian, University of Tennessee
Christopher Eaker is Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Libraries. He is interested in scientific data curation and in integrating sound data stewardship skills into science and engineering curricula. Christopher helps UTK’s researchers navigate... Read More →
BE

Bassem Elsayed

Project Manager, Bibliotheca Alexandrina
GG

Gary Geisler

UX Designer, Stanford University
KG

Katie Gentilello

Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for Alex Gil

Alex Gil

University of Pennsylvania
Columbia University Libraries
TG

Thomas Goodnow

Lafayette College
JG

James Griffin

Co-Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College Libraries
WH

Wendy Hagenmaier

Georgia Institute of Technology Library
avatar for Juliet Hardesty

Juliet Hardesty

Metadata Analyst, Indiana University
Indiana University
KH

Karen Hum

Purdue University
avatar for Rita Johnston

Rita Johnston

Digital Production Librarian, University of North Carolina-Charlotte
Rita is the Digital Production Librarian at the Special Collections and University Archives, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where she leads efforts to make analog materials digitally available and discoverable.
avatar for Drew Krewer

Drew Krewer

Digitization Services Coordinator, University of Houston
University of Houston
ML

Meghan Lafferty

Science & Engineering Librarian, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
ML

Meredith Levin

Western European Humanities Librarian, Columbia University
avatar for Eric Luhrs

Eric Luhrs

Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College
Eric Luhrs is the Director of Digital Scholarship Services at Skillman Library, Lafayette College, where he leads a team of specialist librarians, a CLIR post-doc, and a VR curator responsible for designing and building digital research projects with faculty partners, developing and... Read More →
JM

Joel Minor

Washington University in St. Louis
CM

Catherine Minter

Indiana University
avatar for Amy Neeser

Amy Neeser

Research Data Curation Librarian, University of Michigan
Amy Neeser
avatar for Jeremy Nelson

Jeremy Nelson

Metadata and Systems Librarian, Colorado College
Jeremy Nelson is the Metadata and Systems Librarian at Colorado College, a four-year private liberal arts college in Colorado Springs. In addition to working 8 hours a week on the library's research help desk, providing information literacy instruction to undergraduates, and supervising the library's systems and cataloging departments, Nelson is the... Read More →
avatar for Beryl Ngai

Beryl Ngai

Conference Manager, Alexander Street Press
JN

Joseph Nicholson

University of North Carolina at Charlotte
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Dean of Libraries and Professor of English, James Madison University
avatar for Sue Perry

Sue Perry

Head of Digital Initiatives, UC Santa Cruz
UC Santa Cruz, United States of America
avatar for Ixchel M Faniel PhD

Ixchel M Faniel PhD

Research Scientist, OCLC
My interests include improving how people discover, access and use/reuse content. I'm currently examining how academics manage, share and reuse research data and librarians’ experiences designing and delivering supportive research data management programs. I'm also investigating... Read More →
TP

Trina Purcell

Revs Institute
CR

Carrick Rogers

Stanford University
ER

Elizabeth Rolando

Research Data Librarian, Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for Kelsey Rosell

Kelsey Rosell

Director of Sales, Symplectic
avatar for Justin Schell

Justin Schell

Learning Design Specialist | Shapiro Design Lab, University of Michigan Library
Justin Schell is a filmmaker, writer, photographer, and Learning Design Specialist for the University of Michigan Library. His first documentary, Travel in Spirals, tells the story of Hmong hip-hop artist Tou SaiKo Lee's journey back to Thailand, 30 years after he was born in a... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Skene

Elizabeth Skene

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Western Carolina University
I thrive on efficiency.
CS

Carissa Smith

DuraSpace
avatar for Gail Steinhart

Gail Steinhart

Open Scholarship Services Librarian, Cornell University
arXiv.org, institutional repositories, open science and open scholarship
avatar for Ilana (Barnes) Stonebraker

Ilana (Barnes) Stonebraker

Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University
avatar for Shannon Davis, Washington University

Shannon Davis, Washington University

Digital Library Services Manager, Washington University in St. Louis
avatar for Jess Waggoner

Jess Waggoner

User Experience & Web Services Librarian, University of California, Santa Cruz
avatar for Willeke Wendrich

Willeke Wendrich

Director, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA
CW

Carol Wilczewski

Cultural Heritage Sales, Digital Transitions
Preservation, high quality imaging solutions for all applications.
avatar for Sarah C. Williams

Sarah C. Williams

Life Sciences Data Services Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
AW

Annie Wu

University of Houston
HX

Hao Xu

DICE Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Sarah Young

Sarah Young

Health Science and Policy Librarian, Cornell University Library
Sarah has a BS in biology from Allegheny College; an MS in Biological Sciences from Duquesne University; a degree in International Relations from Aalborg University; and, most recently, a MLIS in Health Resources and Services from U Pitt. At Cornell's Mann Library, she develops information... Read More →
avatar for Frederick Zarndt

Frederick Zarndt

Digital Divide Data
Frederick Zarndt has worked with historic and contemporary newspaper, journal, magazine, book, and records digitisation since computer speeds, software, technology, storage, and costs first made it practical. Frederick has experience in every aspect of digitisation projects including... Read More →
avatar for Tao Zhang

Tao Zhang

Digital User Experience Specialist, Purdue University
User experience, user research, usability test, interface design, wireframes


Monday October 27, 2014 5:15pm - 8:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

8:00pm EDT

#libtechwomen Meetup
An informal meetup for women and their friends in library technology for networking and fun. Come join us! Learn more about #libtechwomen.

No RSVP required.

Presenters
WH

Wendy Hagenmaier

Georgia Institute of Technology Library


Monday October 27, 2014 8:00pm - 10:00pm EDT
Cypress Pint & Plate 817 West Peachtree Street NE, Ste E125, Atlanta, GA 30308
 
Tuesday, October 28
 

6:15am EDT

Running Group

Get your day started right with a run through Atlanta. Eleanor Dickson from Emory University will lead the group. Sign up here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1usu6NYprPPXcLe0ymXxgK3qBY9MiNX3T4-Mj5NvDtD8/edit?usp=sharing

Meet in the Georgia Tech Hotel lobby and head out at 6:20. Map coming soon.


Presenters
avatar for Eleanor Dickson Koehl

Eleanor Dickson Koehl

University of Illinois; HTRC
HathiTrust Research Center, text analysis, #dlfteach, digital library pedagogy


Tuesday October 28, 2014 6:15am - 7:00am EDT
Hotel Lobby GTHCC

7:00am EDT

Breakfast
Breakfast buffet is included Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday in the Conference Dining Room, just off the hotel lobby on the first floor. Simply show your name badge to be seated. Breakfast starts at 6:30 am. Gratuity is included.

If you want to grab a quick bite before heading to a session, continental breakfast is available in the Prefunction area outside our meeting rooms on the second floor, from 7:00-9:00 am.

Tuesday October 28, 2014 7:00am - 9:00am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

8:00am EDT

Registration
Tuesday October 28, 2014 8:00am - 5:00pm EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Avalon Media System: Implementation and Community

Indiana University and Northwestern University, in collaboration with nine partner institutions, are completing the last year of a three-year IMLS-funded effort to build a fully open source solution for managing digital audio and video collections, known as the Avalon Media System. Now in its third full release, Avalon enables libraries and archives to easily curate, distribute and provide online access to their time-based media collections in support of teaching, learning and research. Avalon is based on the Hydra repository software development framework and employs several other open source technologies, including Opencast Matterhorn and Fedora.

Indiana, Northwestern, and several other Avalon community members are currently in the process of implementing Avalon for pilot or production use, both to replace existing time-based media access solutions and to support new use cases for media collections access for teaching, learning, and scholarship. The Avalon community is also exploring options for how the project transitions from a grant-supported project to a community-sustained activity, and Avalon in the process of taking on additional institutions as 'founding sponsors' to help support and guide Avalon's development and potential governance models.

This panel will bring together Avalon project leaders from Indiana and Northwestern, along with representatives from several other institutions involved in the Avalon community, to discuss Avalon's current capabilities, local implementation plans and experiences, future feature development, and options for sustainability.

Session Leaders
Jon Dunn, Indiana University
Julie Rudder, Northwestern University
Bess Sadler, Stanford University
Stephen Davis, Columbia University
Mike Durbin, University of Virginia



Presenters
SD

Stephen Davis

Director, Libraries Digital Program, Columbia University Libraries
avatar for Jon Dunn

Jon Dunn

Assistant Dean for Library Technologies, Indiana University Bloomington Libraries
MD

Michael Durbin

University of Virginia
avatar for Julie Rudder

Julie Rudder

Norwestern University
avatar for Bess Sadler

Bess Sadler

Sr. Develpoer, Data Curation Experts
Talk to me about building data repositories and discovery applications! Blacklight, Samvera, solr, custom data migration, agile software development, scalability and performance -- Stop by the DCE table in the vendor's area and tell me about your digital library goals.


Tuesday October 28, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Big Collections in an Era of Big Copyright: Practical Strategies for Making the Most of Digitized Heritage

Digitized collections of cultural and scholarly heritage can be much more useful to researchers when not limited to materials more than 90 years old. Yet the challenges and risks of going beyond materials old enough to clearly be out of copyright can seem daunting, especially for larger collections. 

This panel features a discussion of how projects like HathiTrust, DPLA, and Europeana face these challenges at scale to make a large number of more recent materials available to their audiences.

Topics discussed will include systems and analyses that enable public domain review of hundreds of thousands of volumes; using rights of libraries, preservation, accessiblity, and fair use to their full extent; documenting and communicating copyright determinations across diffuse collborations; promoting robust reuse rights for contributed content; and dealing with takedowns and legal disputes. The session aims to develop better understandings of the full range of materials and services we can provide under copyright law for digital collections, and promote discussions of how we can collaborate in bringing a wider range of cultural and scholarly materials and services to our users.

Session Leaders
John Mark Ockerbloom, University of Pennsylvania
Melissa Levine, University of Michigan
Jeremy York, HathiTrust
Mark Matienzo, Digital Public Library of America



Presenters
avatar for Melissa Levine

Melissa Levine

Director, U-M Library Copyright Office, University of Michigan
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Assistant Director for Digital Strategy and Access, Stanford University Libraries
JM

John Mark Ockerbloom

University of Pennsylvania
JY

Jeremy York

HathiTrust


Tuesday October 28, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Getting an Earful: The Unexpected Services of a Digital Scholarship Unit + The Best-Laid Schemes: Reflections on Three Years of the NEH ODH Data Management Plan Requirement
Getting an Earful: The Unexpected Services of a Digital Scholarship Unit
Community Notes
Interest in digital scholarship has steadily increased at NYU over the past four years, with scholars looking to the Libraries for information, support, and partnership. During this time, the Libraries have taken an iterative, learn-as-we-go approach while simultaneously conducting in-depth research into user needs and service gaps. This resulted in a four-tiered service model which, in Fall 2013, was officially put into practice with the formation of the Libraries' Digital Scholarship Services unit.

When we introduced the four-tiered service model at DLF, November 2011, we predicted that a key function of our unit would be to prioritize which projects get what type of service (standard, customized, etc.). What we didn't anticipate was the extent to which we would become the nosey switchboard operators of our own organization, listening in on library departmental conversations about their service frustrations, and plugging them into complementary departments or initiatives to address these challenges systemically. These insights are helping us strategically rethink relationships, workflows, and protocols that undergird the organization's work. To date, the departments most frequently connecting via this developing "party line" are special collections, subject specialists, Data Services, Digital Studio, and Digital Library Technology Services.

We will present case studies to illustrate how scholars' project needs are revealing ways we can integrate diverse services across Libraries and IT, and how this vantage point provides a unique opportunity to address longstanding organizational issues.

We will engage the audience through discussion to learn how other institutions approach similar issues providing digital scholarship services. For example:

  • Implementing strategies for bringing together different parts of your organization that don't usually work together
  • Performing outreach for complex services that involve more than one department, and forming partnerships to do this effectively
  • Collection development in relation to digital projects with scholars
  • Transitioning projects into services

Session Leaders
Zach Coble, New York University
Monica McCormick, New York University
Jennifer Vinopal, New York University

AND

The Best-Laid Schemes: Reflections on Three Years of the NEH ODH Data Management Plan Requirement
Community Notes
In 2011, the National Endowment for the Humanities' Office of Digital Humanities began requiring grant applicants to submit a data management plan as one component of a proposal. Modeled on guidelines released by the National Science Foundation, this mandate asks applicants to explicitly describe what data will be produced during the grant period, how it will be preserved and disseminated, and who will be responsible for its maintenance over time. Data management planning helps ensure that, even in the earliest stages of a project, participants consider the technical requirements and institutional resources necessary to ensure that a wide audience may access and build upon the products of grant-funded research.

Drawing on the perspectives of NEH ODH staff, recent grantees, and stakeholders such as the California Digital Library, this moderated panel discussion will examine how, three years later, this requirement has impacted the proposal writing process, what challenges and opportunities have arisen, and how funding agencies can better communicate expectations and respond to the needs of applicants in the future. Questions to be addressed include:

  • With over 700 plans submitted to ODH so far, what common trends—both strengths and pitfalls—have emerged?
  • To what extent has this mandate encouraged further dialogue or collaboration between information professionals and humanities scholars?
  • How successfully have data management plan guidelines addressed the interests of researchers across the humanities as well as scientific disciplines?
  • Considering heightened expectations for grantees' approaches to data curation, where can smaller or less-resourced institutions turn for support?

While it is our hope that the presentation will inform audience members' approaches to developing data management plans and the wider ecosystem around them, NEH staff will also draw on this conversation and on audience feedback to further develop data management guidelines and online resources for potential applicants.

Session Leaders
Perry Collins, National Endowment for the Humanities
Trevor Muñoz, University of Maryland, College Park
Lauren Klein, Georgia Institute of Technology
Stephen Abrams, California Digital Library

 

Presenters
avatar for Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
ZC

Zach Coble

Digital Scholarship Specialist, New York University
PC

Perry Collins

National Endowment for the Humanities
LK

Lauren Klein

Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech
avatar for Monica McCormick

Monica McCormick

Digital Scholarly Publishing Officer, Libraries and Press, New York University
avatar for Trevor Muñoz

Trevor Muñoz

Interim Director, MITH/ Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research, University Libraries, University of Maryland
avatar for Jennifer Vinopal

Jennifer Vinopal

Librarian, New York University
digital libraries, digital scholarship, digital humanities, project management, portfolio management, library service development, organizational culture, leadership


Tuesday October 28, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:30am EDT

Break
Tuesday October 28, 2014 10:30am - 10:45am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

Dive Into Kuali OLE

This will be a walk-through of the technical elements of implementing Kuali OLE (Open Library Environment). Kuali OLE (Open Library Environment) is a community source next-generation library management system developed through a partnership of research libraries with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Operating since July 2010, Kuali OLE is the one of the largest academic library software collaborations in the US.

If you've been wanting to try Kuali OLE and see if it is a good fit for your library but aren't sure how to get started, come join us for a technical discussion of how to get started using Kuali OLE to enable a next generation library management ecosystem for your library. In this presentation we will take a deep dive into the core components of the Kuali OLE architecture, including OLE's use of the Kuali Financial System and RICE middleware, for use with managing library acquisitions workflow.

Session Leaders
Jeffrey Fleming, Duke University

 


Presenters
JF

Jeffrey Fleming

Duke University


Tuesday October 28, 2014 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

Cultivating a Culture of Project Management

The DLF Project Managers Group presents a panel of speakers who are interested in cultivating a culture of project management. Meghan Musolff and Angelina Zaytsev will discuss how the University of Michigan is attempting to develop this culture by creating positions entirely devoted to project management, as well as the creation of an informal skill sharing program open to all Library staff. Attendees will walk away with a framework and the tools to implement similar programs at their own institutions. Delphine Khanna from Temple University will address the broader question of how to manage developers' schedules and how to communicate with administrators realistically about assigning staff resources. She will present the model being developed at Temple to tackle issues such as institution-wide project prioritization, how to handle shifting priorities, and how to maximize the developers' job satisfaction and throughput in a systematic manner. Ann Caldwell from Brown University will discuss how with the implementation of agile project methodology has made planning easier and created a more comfortable environment for staff to take ownership of their work. Cynthia York from Johns Hopkins University will discuss the role of communication channels in agile project management. She will discuss how the use of various tools enhance communication among distributed team members, and the result of efforts to identify overlap which had led to gaps in communication. This diverse panel is designed to provide a space to highlight trends and issues in the broad discipline of library technology project management. Please come ready to listen and contribute to a larger discussion.

Following the session the Project Managers Group is hosting a lunch to continue the conversation (in Conference E).

Session Leaders
Cristela Garcia-Spitz, University of California, San Diego
Carolyn Caizzi, Northwestern University
Ann Caldwell, Brown University
Angelina Zaytsev, University of Michigan
Cynthia York, Johns Hopkins University
Delphine Khanna, Temple University
Meghan Musolff, University of Michigan

 


Presenters
avatar for Carolyn Caizzi

Carolyn Caizzi

Head of Repository and Digital Curation, Northwestern University
AC

Ann Caldwell

Head, Imaging & Metadata Services, Brown University
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Initiatives Librarian, UC San Diego Library
Cristela is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the UC San Diego Library and collaborates across areas of the library, campus, and community on projects to ensure the long-term accessibility and preservation of the University?s unique collections.
avatar for Delphine Khanna

Delphine Khanna

Head of Digital Library Initiatives, Temple University
avatar for Meghan Musolff

Meghan Musolff

Program Manager for Library IT Services, Training, & Assessment, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Cynthia York

Cynthia York

Project Manager, Johns Hopkins University Libraries, United States of America
Project ManagementDigital Humanities projects
avatar for Angelina Zaytsev

Angelina Zaytsev

User Services Librarian, HathiTrust, University of Michigan
HathiTrust Digital Library


Tuesday October 28, 2014 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:45am EDT

Experimental Scholarly Publishing: Building New Models with Distributed Communities of Practice

As library publishing becomes increasingly synonymous with offering traditional journal publishing services, it’s critical that libraries also engage in experimental publishing initiatives. Recent experimental publishing projects, particularly in the digital humanities, have combined basic web technologies to create a new model for aggregating, curating, and disseminating scholarly content using a process that fosters community and resource-sharing. This panel examines the innovations in scholarly publishing offered by the PressForward WordPress plugin, which fosters communities of practices through a post-publication filtering model.

The panel will provide an overview of the PressForward plugin and then discuss how different groups, particularly library groups, are adapting this model in different contexts. For example, the PressForward Project initially created the plugin to highlight and distribute informally published digital humanities scholarship and resources from the open web. Similarly, dh+lib aims to give increased presence and voice to librarians interested in digital humanities, and uses the plugin to distribute a weekly curated selection of the most relevant and timely content. And the ALCTS/LITA Metadata Standards Committee is using the plugin to create a publication for its community of practice designed to go beyond a current awareness service to fostering skill building and deeper community engagement. In examining these projects, we will reveal how the audience can replicate this model for their own library-based and scholarly publishing projects.

What questions or comments do you have about this publication model?

We’d love to hear about your experimental publishing projects: What are they? How are they experimental? What have the results been so far?

Why have your digital publishing initiatives been successful (or not), and what would you like to do to improve them?

Session Leaders
Zach Coble, New York University
Sarah Potvin, Texas A&M University
Lisa Marie Rhody, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Jenn Riley, McGill University
Roxanne Shirazi, CUNY Graduate Center
Stephanie Westcott, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University

 


Presenters
ZC

Zach Coble

Digital Scholarship Specialist, New York University
avatar for Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher

Lecturer
avatar for Sarah Potvin

Sarah Potvin

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah Potvin is the Digital Scholarship Librarian in the Office of Scholarly Communication in the Texas A&M University Libraries. A co-founder of the dh+lib project and co-convener of the new ADHO digital humanities and libraries SIG, she is interested in the ways that libraries and... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Marie Rhody

Lisa Marie Rhody

Associate Director of Research Projects, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Lisa Marie Rhody is Associate Director of Research Projects and Research Assistant Professor at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Her research employs advanced computational methods such as topic modeling to revise existing theories of... Read More →
JR

Jenn Riley

Associate Dean, Digital Initiatives, McGill University
RS

Roxanne Shirazi

CUNY Graduate Center
avatar for Stephanie Westcott

Stephanie Westcott

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media


Tuesday October 28, 2014 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:15pm EDT

Project Management Lunch
Continue or join the conversation from the 10:45am Cultivating a Culture of Project Management session. All are welcome. Box lunch available.

 

Presenters
avatar for Carolyn Caizzi

Carolyn Caizzi

Head of Repository and Digital Curation, Northwestern University
AC

Ann Caldwell

Head, Imaging & Metadata Services, Brown University
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Initiatives Librarian, UC San Diego Library
Cristela is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the UC San Diego Library and collaborates across areas of the library, campus, and community on projects to ensure the long-term accessibility and preservation of the University?s unique collections.
avatar for Delphine Khanna

Delphine Khanna

Head of Digital Library Initiatives, Temple University
avatar for Meghan Musolff

Meghan Musolff

Program Manager for Library IT Services, Training, & Assessment, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Cynthia York

Cynthia York

Project Manager, Johns Hopkins University Libraries, United States of America
Project ManagementDigital Humanities projects
avatar for Angelina Zaytsev

Angelina Zaytsev

User Services Librarian, HathiTrust, University of Michigan
HathiTrust Digital Library


Tuesday October 28, 2014 12:15pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference 2 GTHCC

12:15pm EDT

DevOps for Digital Repositories - Lunch

Damien Edwards provides a great introduction to DevOps practices in the broader technology world:

"DevOps is, in many ways, an umbrella concept that refers to anything that smooths out the interaction between development and operations. DevOps is a response to the growing awareness that there is a disconnect between what is traditionally considered development activity and what is traditionally considered operations activity. This disconnect often manifests itself as conflict and inefficiency." (http://dev2ops.org/2010/02/what-is-devops/)

When applied within the digital repository ecosystem, we should also include the needs and goals of repository managers, and engineers, which we argue closely resemble the goals of "DevOps" within traditional IT operations. Repository managers and engineers affect and are affected by the development and operational efforts in and around the repository, and also greatly benefit from the tools and processes that are emerging from the wider "DevOps" movement.

The working session facilitators will first provide a brief overview of DevOps tenets, benefits and barriers that affect the development and operation of repository systems, including: - scalability, monitoring, availability, reporting, and testing. This will be followed by a group discussion around tools currently in use by members of the group that satisfy specific aspects of DevOps and the benefits of and/or barriers/challenges to implementation.

Session Leaders
Erin Fahy, Stanford University
Bess Sadler, Stanford University

 


Presenters
EF

Erin Fahy

Sr DevOps Engineer, Stanford
avatar for Bess Sadler

Bess Sadler

Sr. Develpoer, Data Curation Experts
Talk to me about building data repositories and discovery applications! Blacklight, Samvera, solr, custom data migration, agile software development, scalability and performance -- Stop by the DCE table in the vendor's area and tell me about your digital library goals.


Tuesday October 28, 2014 12:15pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:15pm EDT

Future Commons: Imagining a Shared Vision of Scholarly Communication - Lunch

Openness, reuse, and reproducibility are goals that transcend any one community’s efforts to affect scholarly communication.  However, despite our shared goals, much expertise and work aren’t known nor leveraged beyond local constituencies.  As such, the DLF, FORCE11, and ARCS are partnering to organize a series of events focused on mapping this landscape to better understand what the scholarly commons involves and articulate a shared vision for the future of scholarly communication. 

The first session will take place at the 2014 DLF Forum.  Attendees will initiate the map by identifying and organizing our community’s goals, experts, projects, tools, experiments, and partners.  We’ll also discuss what’s missing.  The results will be shared openly and in real-time, inviting immediate comment and contributions.

FORCE11 and ARCS will host similar workshops at their conferences in January and April 2015.  The Commons Working Group will continuously curate and integrate the maps and documents.  The knowledge and networks the maps reveal will inspire collaboration and ground the specific work, technologies, and concerns of diverse scholars, practitioners, service providers, and organizations within a shared and living framework.


Session Leader
Robin Champieux, Oregon Health & Science University

 


Presenters
avatar for Robin Champieux

Robin Champieux

Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
I am the Research Engagement & Open Science Librarian at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland Oregon. In that capacity, I work to understand the everyday practices and goals of biomedical researchers and students in order to advance the uptake of open scientific workflows... Read More →


Tuesday October 28, 2014 12:15pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

12:15pm EDT

Lunch Buffet
Enjoy the large selection and excellent fare at the Conference Dining Hall on Level 1.

Tuesday October 28, 2014 12:15pm - 1:30pm EDT
Conference Dining Hall Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center (Level 1)

1:30pm EDT

Digital Public History: Community Connections and Collaborative Teaching Initiatives

Designing community and user engagement with digital collections and supporting technologies in outreach and collection enhancement programs, as well as courses, can yield strong educational partnerships and high levels of community participation. Presenters from four institutions will describe distinct projects with strong community/student/user engagement with digital collections.

  • Georgia State University: Engaging Students in their Local Environment through the Planning Atlanta Digital Collection
    “Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s – 1990s,” a new and innovative digital collection of city planning maps, photographs, city planning publications, local population and housing datasets, and oral histories, provides a vivid portrait of the city’s built environment and depicts structural conditions of buildings, segregated neighborhoods, and land use patterns. All maps can be viewed in Google Maps and Google Earth. Students, educators, and the public are discovering new connections about Atlanta’s built and social environment and are changing their perception of Atlanta in ways that would not be possible without the aid of this digital collection.
  • University of Iowa: Crowdsourcing in the Classroom: Developing a Digital Humanities Curriculum Project for Undergraduates
    The University of Iowa presents a successful case study that integrates DIY History, its collaborative manuscript transcription project, into first-year Rhetoric courses. In partnership with faculty, librarians helped develop a curriculum module that teaches research, writing, and presentations skills through a series of assignments incorporating digital tools and methods. Over a four-week period, undergraduate students transcribe a handwritten letter or diary entry online, research its historic context, and perform a rhetorical analysis of its content; they then share their findings via blog post essays, open-access video screencasts, and a public presentation.
  • University of Illinois: Digital Public History and Collaborative Teaching Initiatives
    Our presentation discusses and critically examines the experience of collaboration between students, instructor, librarians, and archivists for a course on digital public history (DPH) offered to library and information science students. Students approached the study of DPH wearing two hats as scholars/researchers and as LIS professionals, and the physical and virtual manifestations of the UIUC library and the LIS professionals were essential to the success of the course.
  • UCLA: Community connections: from International to hyper-local. Mixing social and mobile with local and international collections for new perspectives on research collections and connections.
    UCLA has partnered with international political activists and our community to develop a unique assemblage of ephemera as well as more traditional collections from sites of conflict and revolutionary movements around the world as well as from our own city. This confluence of collections, scholars and community offer a unique opportunity to create interfaces for discussing perspective, how diasporic digital library collections sparks interest and insider descriptions that are authentic record of history.

Session Leaders
Sarah Shreeves, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Moderator)
Harriett Green, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Christine D'Arpa, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Joseph Hurley, Georgia State University
Kathryn Michaelis, Georgia State University

Jen Wolfe, University of Iowa
Matthew Butler, University of Iowa

Jennifer Weintraub, University of California, Los Angeles
Todd Grappone, University of California, Los Angeles
Sharon Farb, University of California, Los Angeles
Martin Klein, University of California, Los Angeles

 


Moderators
avatar for Sarah Shreeves

Sarah Shreeves

IDEALS Coordinator / Scholarly Commons Co-Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Presenters
MB

Matthew Butler

Research Manager, University of Iowa Libraries
CD

Christine D'Arpa

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Sharon Farb

Sharon Farb

Associate University Librarian, UCLA
Sharon E. Farb is the Associate University Librarian and the chief policy strategist for the UCLA Library. She leads the units that enhance and unlock the Library's rare and unique materials and guides the Library's government relations and public policy efforts.
avatar for Todd Grappone

Todd Grappone

Associate University Librarian, UCLA
Todd Grappone is the AUL for Research and Development. In that role he oversees all IT and Digital Initiatives.
avatar for Harriett Green

Harriett Green

Associate University Librarian, Washington University in St. Louis
I am the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services at Washington University in St. Louis.
avatar for Joseph Hurley

Joseph Hurley

Data Services and GIS Librarian, Georgia State University
Joe Hurley is a Data Services and GIS Librarian at Georgia State University Library. His research interests include historical GIS, urban renewal, demographic and built environment change and writes on urban change in Atlanta. He is the PI on the NEH funded Planning Atlanta: A New... Read More →
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, LANL
KM

Kathryn Michaelis

Digital Projects Coordinator, Georgia State University Library
avatar for Jennifer Weintraub

Jennifer Weintraub

Digital Archivist/Librarian, Schlesinger Library/ Harvard
JW

Jen Wolfe

University of Iowa


Tuesday October 28, 2014 1:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

1:30pm EDT

Best Practices in Geospatial Metadata

Is it Mount McKinley or is it Denali?

Or is it 63.0695, -151.0074?

Maybe it is http://viaf.org/viaf/241195889?

In 1866, was it in Russia or in the United States?

Just how do you record geospatial data in your digital library?

The Utah Academic Library Consortium Digitization Committee and the Mountain West Digital Library have developed the Geospatial Discovery Task Force to examine that very question. The 39 member team comprised of contributors from around the country have spent the last year investigating a variety of geospatial controlled vocabularies, comparing their current practices, and evaluating geospatial tools and interfaces.

Considerations that informed the collaborative work of the task force included:

  • The needs of multiple digital library platforms
  • Variety of digital content and descriptive metadata
  • Possibilities for geospatial metadata enhancement in a harvested environment, particularly for aggregations such as the Digital Public Library of America
  • Existing and future training needs of digital library staff

This working session will provide an opportunity for feedback on proposed geospatial recommendations and open a discussion on the next steps and best practices for recording geospatial information in the digital library community. Participants will have an opportunity to test out the newly developed geospatial metadata decision tree with scenarios from their own digital collections, and refine this tool for use in their libraries and institutions.

Session Leaders
Liz Woolcott, Utah State University
Anna Neatrour, Mountain West Digital Library
Rachel Wittmann, Clemson University
Sandra McIntyre, Mountain West Digital Library
Kristen Jensen, Utah Department of Heritage and Arts
Dustin Olson, Utah State University
Greta Bahnemann, University of Minnesota

 


Presenters
avatar for Greta Bahnemann

Greta Bahnemann

Metadata Librarian, University of Minnesota
Greta Bahnemann is the Metadata Librarian for the Minnesota Digital Library, a position she has held since 2010. At the Minnesota Digital Library, Greta is responsible for implementing current metadata standards and best practices for the Minnesota Digital Library's primary project... Read More →
KJ

Kristen Jensen

Utah Department of Heritage and Arts
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
I am the director of services and operations for HathiTrust, with offices at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Prior to my work with HathiTrust, I was the director of the Mountain West Digital Library for nine years, and, before that, the program manager of the Health Education... Read More →
avatar for Anna Neatrour

Anna Neatrour

Interim Head, Digital Library Services, University of Utah
Interested in digital humanities, collaborative digitization, digital public history, collections as data, digital libraries, metadata, and more!
DO

Dustin Olson

Utah State University
avatar for Rachel Wittmann

Rachel Wittmann

Parks Metadata Specialist, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Liz Woolcott

Liz Woolcott

Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University, Merril-Cazier Library
Liz Woolcott, liz.woolcott@usu.edu, Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services at Utah State University, manages the MARC and non-MARC metadata creation of the University Libraries and is the co-founder of the Library Workflow Exchange. She publishes and presents on workflow and assessment... Read More →


Tuesday October 28, 2014 1:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

1:30pm EDT

Developing with Hydra

This workshop will introduce core concepts needed for developing a Hydra based repository application, including generating a Ruby on Rails app with the Hydra plugin software, data modeling, indexing content into solr, and customizing Blacklight search results. We'll discuss what Hydra solutions exist already or are in development, how to participate in the Hydra open source community, best practices like test driven development, continuous integration, and automated deployment, and how to continue growing your ruby and Hydra skill set.

Participants should bring a laptop already installed with the necessary pre-requisites, as documented on the Dive into Hydra curriculum (https://github.com/projecthydra/hydra/wiki/Dive-into-Hydra). If you need help getting your development environment set up, please consider first attending the Hydra Installfest session, which will prepare participants with the environment needed to engage productively with this workshop. In order to make the best use of our time, we will not be setting up development environments during this workshop.

We will work through Dive into Hydra (https://github.com/projecthydra/hydra/wiki/Dive-into-Hydra) together, then move onto more advanced data modeling exercises. Participants are encouraged to bring their institution's local use cases to the workshop to fuel data modeling conversations.

Session Leader
Bess Sadler, Stanford University


Tuesday October 28, 2014 1:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:30pm EDT

Break
Tuesday October 28, 2014 3:30pm - 3:45pm EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

Snapshots - Group C
Snapshots are 7-minute presentations meant to engage and energize the audience. Presenters are asked to give a dynamic overview of their topic in a quick timeframe, with up to 24 slides. Snapshot presentations are grouped together based on an over-arching theme or idea. There are four groups (A, B, C, and D) of snapshots at the 2014 DLF Forum.

Fixing GIS Data Discovery, Presenting GeoBlacklight
Jack Reed, Stanford University

Organizations spend time and money on creation and acquisition of geospatial data, yet it sits on hard drives, dvds, and shelves without a straightforward way for others to discover it. Discovery tools that do exist have usability issues that alienate users and prevent wide adoption. This has long been a problem not only for academic institutions but also other organizations who use and store geospatial data. We will present GeoBlacklight, a collaboratively designed and developed open source software for discovery of geospatial data. We will present current progress on GeoBlacklight, insights gained from our design process, and future developments.


Let It Go: Exposing Digital Collections for Accessible and Useful Data

Juliet Hardesty, Indiana University

How can you open data from a digital repository and make it discoverable, accessible, and combinable based on the researcher's needs? And how do you usefully combine digital repository, library catalog, and library web site data so researchers can collect, re-purpose, and re-mix the data in support of their research? This snapshot discusses both work completed to expose repository data and plans to combine that data with library catalog and web site data to create a Solr-indexed data source that preserves context and provides thorough, useful, and sharable access to the information, collections, and resources at the Indiana University Libraries.


Suma: Utilizing Emerging Browser Technology to Develop an Open-Source Space and Service Analytics System

Bret Davidson, North Carolina State University
Jason Casden, North Carolina State University

Web designers have long benefited from sophisticated usage analysis tools, however there are few tools to enable the same data-informed design and planning of physical spaces and services. Suma supports integrating observational data into these processes by streamlining existing data collection, providing rich data analysis and visualization capabilities for non-technical users, and promoting observational data analysis. Suma has encouraged the utilization of usage data in large and small planning processes for our libraries as well as over 40 pilot institutions. This talk will discuss how Suma informs space and service planning through the use of the latest web technologies.


RDFa Markup, Schema.org, and DBpedia Topics: A Closer Look at the Holy Trinity of Structured Data and their Impact on the Findability of Digital Collections

Jason Clark, Montana State University

In this snapshot session, we'll look at how structured data practices (e.g., RDFa markup applying Schema.org vocabularies and linking to DBpedia Topics) might enhance findability for digital collections. This research snapshot will build on the search engine optimization work at Montana State University (MSU) Library and consider a control digital collection that has not been optimized versus a digital collection that has been built with semantic topics & machine-actionable markup. Our community has an understanding of how to implement structured data; this session will look more closely at the question of why we should (or shouldn't) do it.


Make it Rain: Integrating Cloud Services and Local Development

William Ying, ARTstor

Shared Shelf, a cloud-based image/video cataloging and asset management service (a subscription service of Artstor), interoperates with various other components in library and pedagogical environment and is developing as a platform around which local programmers can build or implement other needed elements. This integration of Shared Shelf with local development efforts has allowed optimal balance of local and remote services. Shared Shelf exposes the metadata and digital assets through standard-compliant APIs; work with Harvard and Cornell has enabled dynamic harvesting between Shared Shelf cataloging utilities and institutional image and video repositories.

 


Presenters
avatar for Jason Casden

Jason Casden

Interim Associate Head, Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
avatar for Jason Clark

Jason Clark

Head, Library Informatics & Computing, Montana State University
Head, Library Informatics & ComputingMontana State University (MSU) Library
BD

Bret Davidson

Associate Head, Digital Library Initiatives, North Carolina State University
avatar for Juliet Hardesty

Juliet Hardesty

Metadata Analyst, Indiana University
Indiana University
avatar for Jack Reed

Jack Reed

Geospatial Web Engineer, Stanford University


Tuesday October 28, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

Using Confluence & JIRA for Project Management

The UC San Diego Library utilizes Confluence and JIRA for project management, issue tracking, sharing and organizing information, as well as fostering collaboration. We use a distributed, team approach to build digital collections. Furthermore, a set of standing committees reviews and approves project proposals, assigns resources, supports project managers and guides the development of our technical infrastructure. Confluence, a wiki based knowledge management tool, is used to coordinate activities between various programs in our Library, such as digital library development, research data curation, special collections and archives, metadata services, and information technology. JIRA is used for issue tracking. Increased integration within the two tools has allowed for better ways to document decisions, customize workflows and report out on progress. We will share internal processes, including the management of required fixes, desired enhancements and new features in the development of our DAMS, digital assessment management system, and digital collections website.

This working session will consist of two parts. First, we will provide an overview on how the tools are used, and support the project and committee structure surrounding digital library work. This will be geared towards a broader audience on using collaborative software. In the second part, we will have an in-depth demo to walk through specific features in Confluence/JIRA. Finally, we will invite participants to engage in discussion, ask questions, and share best practices. Participants will be able to assess their project tracking approach, and brainstorm how the tools and tactics in use at UC San Diego may be applicable to their work.

Session Leaders
Cristela Garcia-Spitz, University of California, San Diego
Roger Smith, University of California, San Diego
Matt Critchlow, University of California, San Diego



Presenters
MC

Matt Critchlow

Manager of Development and Web Services, UC San Diego
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Initiatives Librarian, UC San Diego Library
Cristela is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the UC San Diego Library and collaborates across areas of the library, campus, and community on projects to ensure the long-term accessibility and preservation of the University?s unique collections.
RS

Roger Smith

Interim AUL Collection Services, Director Digital Library Development Program, UC San Diego Library


Tuesday October 28, 2014 3:45pm - 5:15pm EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:45pm EDT

A User-Centered Approach to Designing Digital Library Applications + A Simple Approach to a Complicated Problem – Open Folklore Portal UX Improvements

A User-Centered Approach to Designing Digital Library Applications

Community Notes
As at other institutions, the range of web applications we develop and support at Stanford University Libraries is growing, as is the audience for those applications. In addition to our library website and online library catalog, in recent years we've added applications for multimedia archives, self-deposit for scholarly resources, discovery of complex geographic data, and self-service digital exhibits. Expanding our range of online offerings certainly enables us to better expose and share the rich collections in our digital repository, but it also brings new challenges. How can designers ensure an institution's growing array of digital library applications provide users of those applications with consistent, enjoyable, and successful experiences?

While best practices from the larger user experience community are an important foundation, we've found that digital library content, and the faculty, students, and librarians who are the main audience for that content, have unique characteristics that must be considered in the design process. Using examples from recent development efforts, we'll illustrate our unique approach to incorporating domain-specific considerations into the user discovery, information architecture, and interaction and visual design phases of our process.

Designers of institutional-based digital library applications have to consider not only the expected end-users of the applications we design, but also a varied set of interested stakeholders. Collection donors, librarians responsible for digital collections, and those concerned with branding and identity at the institution all have an interest in the products we develop. We'll describe how we consider varied stakeholder needs and share our strategies for seeking stakeholder feedback throughout the design and development process.

Finally, we'll conclude this session by briefly describing how the design process and the designer are integrated into our agile development process. We'll also address how Stanford has deployed its user-centered design process to kick-start a variety of community-based open source projects.

Session Leaders
Gary Geisler, Stanford University
Jennifer Vine, Stanford University

AND

A Simple Approach to a Complicated Problem – Open Folklore Portal UX Improvements

Open Folklore, a partnership of the American Folklore Society and the Indiana University Bloomington Libraries, is a scholarly communications effort to make a greater number and variety of useful resources available to folklorists. 

The Open Folklore portal http://openfolklore.org provides a search of open access Folklore repositories and journals. The portal also serves as a primary outlet for the group’s educational and advocacy mission. Last year, as part of an upgrade to the website portal software, the Open Folklore team took the opportunity to make improvements to the portal’s user experience.

Some of the methods used to improve user experience were: moving beyond a text based approach to a more graphics-based approach; breaking down larger ideas into smaller parts; changing the tone from academic to semi-academic; and emphasizing important concepts to accommodate different levels of engagement. 

The presentation reports on lessons learned from the process and results of user testing and surveys of members of the American Folklore Society.

Session Leader
Garett Montanez, Indiana University

  


Presenters
GG

Gary Geisler

UX Designer, Stanford University
GM

Garett Montanez

Indiana University
JV

Jennifer Vine

UX Designer, Stanford Libraries


Tuesday October 28, 2014 3:45pm - 5:15pm EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

6:30pm EDT

Dine Arounds
Keep the conversation going and try one of these hand-picked Atlanta restaurants at the Forum Dine Arounds. Reservations are for eight people at 6:30 pm.

Restaurant info and sign up here: http://www.diglib.org/forums/2014forum/dine-arounds/

Tuesday October 28, 2014 6:30pm - 8:00pm EDT
Midtown Atlanta Resaurants
 
Wednesday, October 29
 

7:00am EDT

Breakfast

Breakfast buffet is included Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday in the Conference Dining Room, just off the hotel lobby on the first floor. Simply show your name badge to be seated. Breakfast starts at 6:30 am. Gratuity is included.

If you want to grab a quick bite before heading to a session, continental breakfast is available in the Prefunction area outside our meeting rooms on the second floor, from 7:00-9:00 am.


Wednesday October 29, 2014 7:00am - 9:00am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

8:00am EDT

DLF Program Update
Find out what's happening at DLF including updates on the Director search and other program activities. Join CLIR's president, Charles Henry, and members of the DLF Advisory Committee for a conversation. Questions welcome!

 

Presenters
CH

Charles Henry

President, Council on Library and InformationResources
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Digital Content Strategist, The Pennsylvania State University
I manage Penn State's repository service, ScholarSphere (https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/), which promotes open, persistent access to the research outputs, including data sets, of Penn State's faculty, students, and staff. I'd love to talk about promotion of student scholarship through... Read More →
avatar for Max Marmor

Max Marmor

Arts Professional, Samuel H. Kress Foundation
I'm a former art librarian (UCLA, Columbia, NYU/IFA, Yale) and left librarianship in 2001 to be part of the Mellon Foundation's planning team for ARTstor. In 2007 I moved to the Kress Foundation.
avatar for Trevor Muñoz

Trevor Muñoz

Interim Director, MITH/ Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research, University Libraries, University of Maryland
avatar for Sarah Shreeves

Sarah Shreeves

IDEALS Coordinator / Scholarly Commons Co-Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Jennifer Vinopal

Jennifer Vinopal

Librarian, New York University
digital libraries, digital scholarship, digital humanities, project management, portfolio management, library service development, organizational culture, leadership


Wednesday October 29, 2014 8:00am - 8:50am EDT
Conference E Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

8:00am EDT

Registration
Wednesday October 29, 2014 8:00am - 3:00pm EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Snapshots - Group D
Snapshots are 7-minute presentations meant to engage and energize the audience. Presenters are asked to give a dynamic overview of their topic in a quick timeframe, with up to 24 slides. Snapshot presentations are grouped together based on an over-arching theme or idea. There are four groups (A, B, C, and D) of snapshots at the 2014 DLF Forum.

Digital Projects and Undergraduate Education
Mark Dahl, Lewis & Clark College

At liberal arts colleges, digital projects led by faculty and facilitated by the library are an opportunity for students to engage in scholarly inquiry. In this snapshot session, I will give an overview of digital projects at liberal arts colleges including collections developed around faculty teaching and research interests, student-created collections and exhibits, and digital field scholarship. Drawing from cases at several colleges, I will discuss the role that the library can play in facilitating these types of projects.


Digital Archives Pilot Project: Fostering Interdepartmental Collaboration

Nicole Finzer, Northwestern University

This talk will give an overview of the Digital Archives Pilot Project and how the collaborative efforts were managed using scrum methodology at Northwestern University Library. The result of this agile work was a final report that stated the mandate and scope of the Digital Archives Pilot Project (DAPP), and how it can help to articulate the policy, criteria, and strategies for collection development, and to define technical and staffing for policy makers.


Recipes for Engagement: A Cookbook for Interactive Spaces

Jason Ronallo, North Carolina State University
Mike Nutt, North Carolina State University

Libraries have begun to embrace interactive digital spaces as platforms for new kinds of services. With the opening of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, the NCSU Libraries has created several of these spaces with various affordances. One of our goals for these spaces is to foster a high level of engagement with the university community. We will speak about two ways we are thinking about engagement and show examples of them in practice. First, we have developed engaging, interactive, participatory applications. Second, we are engaging our community in the creation of new kinds of scholarly communication for public display.


Interactive Visualization: Video Walls for Collaborative Research and Discovery

Krista Graham, Georgia State University
Khyle Hannan, Georgia State University
Joseph Hurley, Georgia State University
Bryan Sinclair, Georgia State University

This snapshot will discuss large-scale video walls in libraries designed for collaboration that can change users' perspective and reframe and amplify digital content in shared physical spaces. Georgia State University Library's newly-opened CURVE: Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment features a 24-by-4.5-foot, high-resolution CURVE interactWall that expands student and faculty access to digital resources, data visualization, and more.

 


Presenters
MD

Mark Dahl

Director of the Watzek Library, Lewis & Clark College
NF

Nicole Finzer

Digital Projects & Outreach Librarian, Northwestern University
avatar for Krista Graham

Krista Graham

Department Head, Digital Library Services, Georgia State University
KH

Khyle Hannan

Georgia State University
avatar for Joseph Hurley

Joseph Hurley

Data Services and GIS Librarian, Georgia State University
Joe Hurley is a Data Services and GIS Librarian at Georgia State University Library. His research interests include historical GIS, urban renewal, demographic and built environment change and writes on urban change in Atlanta. He is the PI on the NEH funded Planning Atlanta: A New... Read More →
avatar for Mike Nutt

Mike Nutt

Associate Head, Data & Visualization Services, Libraries, North Carolina State University Libraries
Mike Nutt is Associate Head of the Data & Visualization Services department at North Carolina State University Libraries in Raleigh. He is currently leading the service design effort for the Data Experience Lab, a data science and digital scholarship space that will open in the renovated... Read More →
avatar for Jason Ronallo

Jason Ronallo

Head, Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
NCSU Libraries
avatar for Bryan Sinclair

Bryan Sinclair

Associate Dean, University Library, Georgia State University
As Associate Dean for Public Services at Georgia State University Library, I provide leadership in multiple innovative service areas, including research support, campus outreach & instruction, research data services, access & media services, and student technology support.


Wednesday October 29, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Voice of the Past and Present; Ensuring a Digital Future: Blueprint of the HBCU Library Alliance

The HBCU Library Alliance was established in 2002 by library deans and directors of White House-designated Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and is the only membership organization to exclusively serve HBCU libraries. For more than ten years, this organization has successfully provided an array of resources designed to support HBCU libraries and their constituents. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the HBCU Library Alliance has strengthened member institutions through programs including leadership development, photographic preservation and digital services.

This presentation will describe the vibrant history and accomplishments of HBCU Library Alliance programs with an emphasis on the Alliance’s Digital Initiative.

Session Leaders
Cynthia L. Henderson, Howard University
Elizabeth G. McClenney, Atlanta University Center Woodruff Library
 


Wednesday October 29, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Placing the IR within the User's Workflow: Connecting Hydra-based Repositories with Zotero + Redesigning Electronic Record Processing and Preservation at NARA
Two project updates:

Placing the IR within the User's Workflow: Connecting Hydra-based Repositories with Zotero
Community Notes
This session presents an update on the research conducted in an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded project at Penn State University. The first phase of the project (2012-13) explored the scholarly workflow of the Penn State faculty across the sciences, humanities, and social sciences, focusing on the integration of digital technologies at all stages of a research lifecycle—from collecting and analyzing data, over managing and storing research materials, to writing up and sharing research findings. The current phase of the study (2014-2016) centers on developing a digital research tool for humanities scholarship using Zotero as a test platform, in collaboration with George Mason University. Based on the results of the first phase of our study, we will focus on unifying several phases of the research workflow, and facilitating elements such as better integration of finding and archiving into the scholar's online path. Specifically, we aim to connect Zotero with Penn State's Hydra-based institutional repository, ScholarSphere. Penn State Zotero users will be able to claim their publications and then seamlessly login and store copies within ScholarSphere. This project aims to place self-archiving within a tool that already has good traction within the Humanities (Zotero), and increase the visibility of an institutional repository within the workflow of digital scholars. Preliminary development as well as additional details on the technology, including options for other Hydra-based repositories to adopt this workflow, will be shared during this research update. We will also discuss specific needs of Humanities scholars as found in the first iteration of this study, and how these implications are addressed in the Zotero / ScholarSphere software integration.

Session Leaders
Dawn Childress, Penn State University
Patricia Hswe, Penn State University
Ellysa Cahoy, Penn State University

AND

Redesigning Electronic Record Processing and Preservation at NARA
Community Notes
The US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is in the process of refactoring its infrastructure for the processing and preservation of electronic records.

In gathering requirements to enhance the tool suite at NARA, a number of needs were identified. The key need was for a flexible processing environment with an expandable set of software tools to verify and process a significant volume and varieties of electronic records. Existing systems lacked support for non-Federal digital materials (e.g., digital surrogate masters, Legislative, Donated, Supreme Court, etc.) or classified digital materials. And given highly successful partnerships with other types of organizations, there are growing storage for digital surrogates and a need for a more efficient workflows to provide public access.

This new infrastructure is described as the Optimized Ingest Framework (OIF). This framework includes a new model for managing the receipt and processing of digital materials for preservation and access; a modular approach to systems managing digital materials; a departure from the model of a single, monolithic system; the refactoring and evolution of existing systems; the establishment of an environment to provide necessary processing flexibility and tools for a wide variety of digital materials; and a more automated and robust solution for digital preservation with reduced complexity. 

This refactoring comprises three modular systems: a Digital Processing Environment (DPE) that encompasses a suite of tools for processing including validation, characterization and transformation of files; a Business Object Management system to create and manage workflows for transfer and ingest; and an enhanced Digital Object Repository for the management and preservation of records and surrogates. 

This project is just getting underway at NARA with its first iteration DPE prototype currently scheduled for early 2015.

Session Leader
Leslie Johnston, National Archives and Records Administration

 


Presenters
avatar for Ellysa Cahoy

Ellysa Cahoy

Education Librarian, Penn State University
DC

Dawn Childress

Librarian, Digital Collections and Scholarship, UCLA
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Digital Content Strategist, The Pennsylvania State University
I manage Penn State's repository service, ScholarSphere (https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/), which promotes open, persistent access to the research outputs, including data sets, of Penn State's faculty, students, and staff. I'd love to talk about promotion of student scholarship through... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Johnston

Leslie Johnston

Director of Digital Preservation, National Archives


Wednesday October 29, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

9:00am EDT

Running Up That Hill: The Academic Preservation Trust: A Community Based Approach to Digital Preservation + Accessing Digital Art: Emulation and Preservation of Complex Digital Art Objects

Two project updates:

Running Up That Hill: The Academic Preservation Trust: A Community Based Approach to Digital Preservation
Community Notes
The Academic Preservation Trust (APT), a consortium of 17 institutions, was formed two and a half years ago when a small group of academic library deans agreed to take a community approach in building and managing a repository that would provide long-term preservation of the scholarly record. The repository also aims to aggregate content, to provide for disaster recovery, to leverage economies of scale, and to explore access and other services. From its beginning, APTrust has been a layered collaboration of deans, technology experts, content/preservation specialists, and a small APTrust staff located at the University of Virginia. 

The growth of the consortium has been bumpy at times, with differences of opinion regarding technology decisions and, inside the University of Virginia, in building awareness that an entrepreneurial program requires quick responses from the infrastructure. APTrust remains repository and format agnostic by using the Baglt specification for content submission. Metadata is managed by Fedora with pointers to content preserved in Amazon S3 and Glacier with administrative functions built using Hydra and Blacklight. The repository is scheduled to go live in July and will become a DPN node. A panel of APTrust partners and UVA staff will describe the interplay in decision making among deans, technologists, and content experts and will discuss the evolving nature of an effort that is approaching full production, including questions of governance, business modeling, certification goals and the consortium's evolving approach to the complex issues related to digital preservation.

Session Leaders
Bradley Daigle, University of Virginia
Scott Turnbull, APTrust
Laura Capell, University of Miami
Stephen Davis, Columbia University
Elisabeth Long, University of Chicago
Nathan Tallman, University of Cincinnati 

AND

Accessing Digital Art: Emulation and Preservation of Complex Digital Art Objects
Community Notes
We will provide an overview of the strategies and desired outcomes of PAFDAO: Preservation and Access Frameworks for Digital Art Objects, a two-year Research and Development, NEH-funded project. We will describe technical challenges in general as well as those that are idiosyncratic to the content at hand, and outline strategies we employ to address them. The talk will focus primarily on technical components of the project: disc imaging, the metadata framework and the organization of the PAFDAO deposit to the Cornell University Library Archival Repository (CULAR). The requirements specific to this project for imaging, metadata and organization of deposit are more complex than typical digital preservation projects due to these works' interdependencies with emulation environments and concerns over fidelity of experience in an emulated environment. 

We will share our processes and encourage discussion with participants concerning digital preservation of complex media.

Project Background: 

In February 2013, the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art, part of Cornell University Library's Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, received a $300,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop PAFDAO: preservation and access frameworks for complex digital media art objects: http://www.neh.gov/files/grants/cornell_universitypreservation_and_access_framework_for_digital_art_objects.pdf

PAFDAO's test collection includes more than 300 interactive born-digital artworks created for CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, and web distribution, many of which date back to the early 1990s. Though vitally important to understanding the development of media art and aesthetics over the past two decades, these materials are at serious risk of degradation and are unreadable without obsolete computers and software.

Our goal is to create a scalable preservation workflow to ensure the best feasible access to these materials for decades to come, and also contribute to the development of coherent best practices in the area of preserving complex media collections.

Session Leaders
Jason Kovari, Cornell University
Dianne Dietrich, Cornell University
Michelle A. Paolillo, Cornell University

 

Presenters
LC

Laura Capell

Head of Digital Production, University of Miami
Laura is the Head of Digital Production at the University of Miami, where she manages digital projects for special collections materials.
avatar for Bradley Daigle

Bradley Daigle

Strategic and Content Expert/Chair NDSA Leadership, University of Virginia
University of Virginia
SD

Stephen Davis

Director, Libraries Digital Program, Columbia University Libraries
DD

Dianne Dietrich

Cornell University
avatar for Jason Kovari

Jason Kovari

Director, Cataloging and Metadata Services, Cornell University
avatar for Elisabeth Long

Elisabeth Long

Associate University Librarian for IT and Digital Scholarship, University of Chicago
avatar for Michelle Paolillo

Michelle Paolillo

Digital Lifecycle Services Lead, Cornell University
Michelle is Cornell University's Library's Lead for Digital Lifecycle Services. She is invested in the practical logistics of digital preservation (harmonizing workflows, preservation storage, interoperability, systems design, etc.). She also serves as Cornell's HathiTrust coordinator... Read More →
avatar for Nathan Tallman

Nathan Tallman

Digital Content Strategist, Assistant Librarian, University of Cincinnati
avatar for Scott Turnbull

Scott Turnbull

Lead Engineer, APTrust - University of Virginia
I'm the lead engineer for APTrust, providing preservation and aggregate repository services for 16+ Universities nation wide. I'm also passionate about digital humanities and academic computing.


Wednesday October 29, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:00am EDT

Break
Wednesday October 29, 2014 10:00am - 10:15am EDT
Prefunction Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:15am EDT

Beyond the Digital Surrogate: Discovery and Analysis of Digital Collections

The so-called "data turn" in the humanities suggests new research possibilities for digital collections. This panel will feature three presentations on projects that support text and image analysis in digital collections. First, TOME is a tool that draws on topic modeling to support the interactive exploration and visualization of text-based archives. Second, DocSouth Data is an enhancement to UNC’s North American Slave Narratives Collection website designed to facilitate "distant reading" techniques. The third presentation shifts from text-based analysis to analysis of texts as images, offering an overview of the work of the Image Analysis for Discovery Team, which seeks to leverage the information potential of visual cues in the millions of digital images we create for digital libraries. The three short presentations will leave time for broader discussion with the audience.

Session Leaders
Stewart Varner, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lauren Klein, Georgia Tech
Elizabeth Lorang, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Leen-Kiat Soh, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Presenters
LK

Lauren Klein

Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech
avatar for Elizabeth Lorang

Elizabeth Lorang

Digital Humanities Projects Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
avatar for Leen-Kiat Soh

Leen-Kiat Soh

Professor, University of Nebraska
avatar for Stewart Varner

Stewart Varner

Managing Director, Price Lab for Digital Huamanities, University of Pennsylvania
UNC Chapell Hill Libraries


Wednesday October 29, 2014 10:15am - 11:45am EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:15am EDT

Moving Forward with Digital Library Assessment

Assessment is a necessity: in the face of diminishing resources and tremendous demand for online access to research materials, most of us are pressed to justify our need for funding, and seek to maximize our resources to best serve user needs and provide a strong return on investment. There are multiple facets to assessment: evaluating interfaces, content, benefits, and impact, comparing online services to user needs, and measuring costs. Building off of two sessions at last year's conference, this session will address several of these facets in an effort to identify next steps toward developing best practices and guidelines. An important emerging area for evaluating impact of digital libraries is the use of altmetrics; Lagace will report on NISO's current community effort to evaluate and standardize various forms of alternative impact measurements. Chapman will discuss a developing framework to assist institutions in developing viable cost estimates for proposed digitization projects. DeRidder will report on a qualitative study of faculty researchers utilizing a broad array of online primary source interfaces that identified gaps in services and unmet needs, and Yoo will present a case study evaluating the usability of the UCSD Digital Collections through user interactions with the website. Following these presentations, we will engage the audience in small group discussions about what steps should follow in efforts to develop best practices and guidelines for digital library assessment in key areas, and how best to proceed.

The DLF Assessment Working Group will host an assessment-themed lunch (in Conference B) after this session to continue the conversation.

Session Leaders
Jody DeRidder, University of Alabama
Joyce Chapman, Duke University
Nettie Lagace, National Information Standards Organization
Ho Jung Yoo, University of California, San Diego

 


Presenters
JC

Joyce Chapman

Assessment Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
HJ

Ho Jung Yoo

University of California, San Diego


Wednesday October 29, 2014 10:15am - 11:45am EDT
Salons 1,2,3 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

10:15am EDT

Perspectives on Supporting and Administering Maker Culture and Programs in Libraries

Makerspaces are popping up all over, and it seems that the maker movement, as some call it, is still early in its growth phase. Many libraries—public and academic—dabble in this area; while some makerspaces are modest corners with a few Arduinos, others go further and offer sophisticated spaces and technology. Even the White House is getting in on making, sponsoring its first ever Maker Faire in June 2014. Whether one accepts the rhetoric that making represents the beginning of manufacturing's return to North America or not, making/makerspaces clearly touch a nerve in many people who have an innate wish to move beyond being consumers of technology and media.

The speakers will approach the topic of making from the vantage point of both those who are seeking support for initiatives as well as those in administrative positions who are asked to support them. There are myriad issues to consider when considering such support, some of which are not typical of library programs and services, e.g.- hazardous material and life safety concerns. Others are perhaps better known issues, but have their own making-specific dynamics. For example, cost recovery for materials is challenging, as is addressing some of the inherent gender and race issues that tend to arise in technology environments.

Beyond offering spaces, the panel will present perspectives on integrating making and maker concepts into the undergraduate curriculum. These courses tend to prove popular, but scale issues arise along the way, as do many other issues that require our attention. This will be a visually rich panel, with many images from makerspaces illustrating the panelists remarks, and will also have some technology on hand for those who have yet to encounter exotic beasts such as Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, littleBits, and Makey Makeys in the wild.

Sponsored by Taiga 

Session Leaders
Dale Askey, McMaster University
Jason Griffey, Evenly Distributed
Michael Holt, Valdosta State
Tara Radniecki, University of Nevada, Reno

 


Presenters
avatar for Dale Askey

Dale Askey

Associate University Librarian, CORNELL INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH (CISER)
Twitter is @daskey.
avatar for Jason Griffey

Jason Griffey

Founder & Principal Consultant, NISO
Testing
avatar for Michael Holt

Michael Holt

Marketing and Assessment Librarian, Valdosta State University
TR

Tara Radniecki

Head, Science & Engineering Library, University of Nevada, Reno


Wednesday October 29, 2014 10:15am - 11:45am EDT
Salons 4,5,6 Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

11:45am EDT

Developing an Understanding of Librarian 3.0 - Lunch

This lunch session will focus on exploring and understanding the place of the librarian in Library 3.0. While there is growing research into the "point oh" library models (see for example, Kwanya et al. 2012), the place of the librarian in these models is sparse and for the most part limited to lists of competencies and skills desired or required for work in Library 2.0 and 3.0. (see for example, Huvila, et al. 2012 and Vanwynsberghe, et al. 2014). While valuable, the existing accounts focusing on tools fail to understand the place of the librarian in libraries in relationship to the Library 3.0 philosophy. Through this discussion we can begin to understand both the traditional librarian and the untraditional librarian within Library 3.0. Discussion leaders, with a variety of librarian roles, will help lead this session. It will start with a brief overview of the Library 1.0 through 3.0 philosophies and then the groups will break out to discuss the place (or places) of the librarian in Library 3.0. Specific outcomes, such as describing 5 different roles librarians have in library 3.0 and/or 5 ways to support non-traditional librarian roles in the library may be developed based on consensus within the group.

References: Tom Kwanya, Tom; Christine Stilwell; Peter G. Underwood. Intelligent libraries and apomediators: Distinguishing between Library 3.0 and Library 2.0. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science September 2013 vol. 45 no. 3 187-197. Vanwynsberghe, Hadewijch; Ruben Vanderlinde; Annabel Georges; Pieter Verdegem. The librarian 2.0: Identifying a typology of librarians' social media literacy. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science January 28, 2014 Isto Huvila, Isto; Kim Holmberg; Maria Kronqvist-Berg; Outi Nivakoski; Gunilla Widén. What is Librarian 2.0 – New competencies or interactive relations? A library professional viewpoint, Journal of Librarianship and Information Science September 2013 vol. 45 no. 3

Session Leaders
Hannah Rasmussen, Harvard Business School
Melissa Shaffer, Harvard Business School

 


Presenters
HR

Hannah Rasmussen

Researcher, Indiana University


Wednesday October 29, 2014 11:45am - 1:00pm EDT
Conference A Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

11:45am EDT

Digital Assessment Lunch
Continue or join the conversation after the 10:15am Moving Forward with Digital Library Assessment session. Box lunch available.

 

Presenters
JC

Joyce Chapman

Assessment Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
SH

Suhui Ho

University of California, San Diego
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
HJ

Ho Jung Yoo

University of California, San Diego


Wednesday October 29, 2014 11:45am - 1:00pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

11:45am EDT

Lunch Buffet
Enjoy the large selection and excellent fare at the Conference Dining Hall on Level 1.

Wednesday October 29, 2014 11:45am - 1:00pm EDT
Conference Dining Hall Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center (Level 1)

1:00pm EDT

Closing Remarks and Keynote Address
Closing Remarks

Closing Keynote:

Bonnie Tijerina will close the Forum, pulling together the conversations of the Forum to the broader themes of her work at the Data and Society Institute.Bonnie is a librarian, entrepreneur and library community convener. She is currently a Data & Society Fellow at the Data & Society Institute in New York City. She is founder of ER&L (Electronic Resources & Libraries) conference and organization, created to facilitate communication and foster collaboration among information management and e-resources professionals in libraries. Bonnie has worked in academic libraries for over ten years, most recently at Harvard University. She relishes the role of library convener and in 2013 initiated an effort to connect the library community with tech, academia, and business with the #ideadrop Library House, an effort she led during SXSW Interactive. Bonnie is also co-founder of the Leadership, Technology and Gender Summit. Bonnie is working to engage the library community in a broad conversation on the future of libraries and the important role library professionals can play in a modern, digital world. 

 

Presenters
avatar for Bonnie Tijerina

Bonnie Tijerina

President, ER&L
Bonnie Tijerina is a librarian, entrepreneur and library community convener. She is currently a Data & Society Fellow at the Data & Society Institute in New York City. She is founder of ER&L (Electronic Resources & Libraries) conference and organization, created to facilitate communication... Read More →


Wednesday October 29, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:00pm EDT

docWorks User's Group Meeting
Presenters
avatar for Frederick Zarndt

Frederick Zarndt

Digital Divide Data
Frederick Zarndt has worked with historic and contemporary newspaper, journal, magazine, book, and records digitisation since computer speeds, software, technology, storage, and costs first made it practical. Frederick has experience in every aspect of digitisation projects including... Read More →


Wednesday October 29, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Conference E Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

3:00pm EDT

Ally Skills Workshop

The Ally Skills Workshop teaches simple, everyday ways to support women in their workplaces and communities. Participants learn techniques that work at the office, at conferences, and online. The skills taught are relevant everywhere, including those particularly relevant to open technology and culture communities. At the end of the workshop, participants will feel more confident in speaking up to support women, be more aware of the challenges facing women in their workplaces and communities, and have closer relationships with the other participants.

Brief description slightly modified from full description available at adainitiative.org.

Details

Training by Valerie Aurora, Ada Initiative's Founder

Wednesday, October 29, 2014
3:00-5:00pm
Conference B, Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

Registration: $30
Limited to 30 participants.

The Ally Skills Workshop is a program of the Ada Initiative, supporting women in open technology and culture.


Presenters
avatar for Valerie Aurora

Valerie Aurora

Executive Director, The Ada Initiative
Valerie Aurora is the Executive Director and co-founder of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit dedicated to promoting women in open tech/culture. In addition to leading the development and adoption of conference anti-harassment policies, Aurora created and teaches the Ada Initiative... Read More →


Wednesday October 29, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Conference B Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center
 
Thursday, October 30
 

8:30am EDT

Listening-Based Python Workshop
A Ready, Set: Code! Event

Instructor: Andromeda Yelton

This workshop is for those that have some prior experience of Python, but need an extra boost to apply those skills to their work. Examples for the workshop will be tailored around participants’ use cases that surface in the first conference call; follow-up calls will focus on debugging their work and helping them find personally relevant next steps. Participation in all conference calls and the in-person workshop is required.

Overview
  • Conference call 1 (90 minutes): Participants talk about what has and hasn’t worked for them in previous Python learning, and their programming use cases.
  • Workshop (full-day, October 30): review of Python fundamentals. This will be a partially self-paced boot camp based on the Boston Python Workshop; however, the project portions will be replaced with a custom-designed project focused on building skills identified from participants’ use cases. There will be an assignment to work on for the follow-up calls.
  • Conference calls 2-4 (60 minutes each): Participants will collaborate to debug their programs and identify next steps. This encourages practice and skills application, in a personally relevant context.  The final conference call will be a chance for participants to showcase their work.

Curriculum materials for the workshop portion will be freely available online after the event.

As with all our events, DLF seeks to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment. Please take a moment to review our Code of Conduct.

Cost

$150
$100 for CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellows
$75 for students

Register by October 5. Students use promotion code PythonStudent14 to save $75. CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellows use promotion code CLIRDLFpfpPW to save $50.


Thursday October 30, 2014 8:30am - 5:00pm EDT
Woodruff Library, Rm 314 Emory University

9:00am EDT

Taiga Forum 10
Building Employee Engagement: Frank talk about improving learning, broadening thinking, and increasing cooperation in the workplace

Taiga Forum is pleased to announce that DeEtta Jones (@DeEttaMJones), author, speaker, strategy consultant and former ARL director of organizational learning, is leading the Taiga Forum 10/DLF workshop. Come and learn with a group of AUL/AD peers what it takes to nurture and sustain engaged staff within libraries. Join us as we discover methods and strategies that broaden thinking, reduce negativity, heighten learning, and increase cooperation between individuals.

  • Why and how do employees become and remain engaged or fall in the problematic categories - disengaged and actively disengaged?
  • What is the organization’s approach to engagement?
  • Can managers develop employee engagement strategies that ensure staff remain engaged?
  • What is the organization’s approach to enhancing commitment?
  • Is it OK to give up or ignore the actively disengaged?
  • How does one know which way to go?

This full-day workshop will focus on strategies for helping disengaged employees become more engaged in the workplace. Finally, we will talk about what can be done with the actively disengaged, who can disproportionately and negatively impact organization. The event will be followed by the ever-popular Taiga Social. Open to all.

Details

Jones Room, Main Library
Emory University
540 Asbury Cir, Atlanta, GA 30322

Registration: $90

 


Presenters

Thursday October 30, 2014 9:00am - 4:00pm EDT
Jones Room, Main Library, Emory University 540 Asbury Cir, Atlanta, GA 30322